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From what I understand Lagrange points aren't perfectly stable and thus you would need to be able to stabilize the mass. However static would assist gravity in keeping a pile of debris, especially aggregate, together, so make sure to take that into account. Sadly a mass big enough to be a stable jumping point would have potentially damaging effects on ...


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Not touching upon how "useful" this could be as a stepping stone, as that's difficult to answer, but the more narrow question "Will a pile of rocks stick together at EML4, or drift apart due to tidal forces?" is quite answerable. An object near EML4 is acted upon by several forces, mostly the Earth's gravity balancing inertia in the rotating frame of ...


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Wikipedia covers this. The 1 in 1410 probability comes from Long-term impact risk for (101955) 1999 RQ36 in 2009 which notes... The analysis of impact possibilities so far in the future is strongly dependent on the action of the Yarkovsky effect, which raises new challenges in the careful assessment of longer term impact hazards. With better ...


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You can certainly reverse a gravity assist to lose velocity. Most inner system probes do so. For a classic gravity assist the object has to leave the influence of the assisting body so for capturing an asteroid the answer is technically no, there is no way to achieve a low altitude circular orbit of a single body purely by gravity assists. It is certainly ...


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"Assume lots of delta V" If you're using chemical rockets that would mean propellent mass comparable or greater than the asteroid mass. A quick chart: Exhaust velocity for hydrogen/oxygen is about 4.4 km/s. 3/4.4 = ~ln(2). So every 3 km/s added to the delta V budget about doubles over all mass. It's quite plausible to have solar powered hall thrusters ...


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Even if it is possible we should not do it. Low Earth orbits do decay over years, decades, centuries or millennias. Low orbits decay faster than higher orbits. If we do not want the asteroid to hit the surface of Earth sometime, we have to do station keeping forever. Only a very small asteroid would fully disintegrate during atmospherical reentry but not ...


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