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3

The Search for Life on Mars (Christopher P. Mckay, 1996) quotes Klein, H. P.: 1978, Icarus 34, 666–674. Klein, H. P.: 1979, Rev. Geophys. Space Phys. 17, 1655–1662. Horowitz, N. H.: 1986, To Utopia and Back: The Search for Life in the Solar System, W. Also by Mckay: 4 .McKay C. P. et al. 1998. The Mars Oxidant experiment (MOx) for Mars '96. Planet. ...


18

The two extremes are the most-likely sources of death for creatures in space - weightlessness and the g-force of takeoff. Weightlessness could be a critical issue for any creature which relies totally on gravity for swallowing - it's likely that some bird species would not be able to properly eat or drink in space. In the long-term, it's likely that a few ...


5

No, because the "space" is mostly just "no gravity" but the gravity can be simulated just by rotation. Also, any animals are unlikely to die immediately without the gravity because otherwise just turning upside down would kill them on the Earth. This is differently from human-made devices like pendulum clocks or even car engines - these are not normally ...


12

Lugworms living in the sand below tidal sea waters. They need gravity to burrow in and feed from the tiny animals living between sand particles. They would survive some weeks without food. Starfish, sea urchin, sea cucumbers could not live in microgravity for longer time. They need the ocean floor to move and search for food. Starfish and sea urchins do not ...


42

To keep an animal alive, a spacecraft needs to create conditions (e.g. temperature, pressure, concentrations of gases or electrolytes) within the animal's normal physiological range. We can recreate nearly any environment; however, the resources necessary to do this may be prohibitive. Thus, the answer to the question is that it may be possible, yet ...


2

This started out as a comment on 3), but this should be a rough answer by now. This means exactly what it says on the tin. They have been observed for so long that we have accurate enough data on them to not confuse them with other objects. They are not in the process of being identified as belonging to a specific launch. The cracks in the surveillance ...


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