We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.
120

I believe it was John Young, during an Apollo 16 EVA fell to the lunar surface. Though awkward, he got up unassisted by attempting a series of what looks like push-ups until he was able to get himself to his knees. Then he had little difficulty standing up from resting on his knees. This YouTube clip shows how he did it. Apollo 16 astronaut falls and ...


71

According to Chris Hadfield's answer during his Reddit AMA: "We have a squishy thing inside we jam our nose into while we clear our ears — we scratch our nose on that." The "squishy thing" is formally known as a Valsalva device (used by both astronauts and divers for equalizing pressure in their sinuses. (Thanks to Organic Marble's comment). In addition, ...


53

As always, the Apollo Lunar Surface Journal is a treasure trove of annotated examples. During the later (J) missions in particular, Ed Fendell, remotely operating the rover's TV camera, managed to capture a few for posterity. Falling forward (straight or a bit to one side) happened to several moon walkers, and getting up was not that difficult. Only Charlie ...


52

At least in the Shuttle program, I'm afraid the list of forbidden foods was almost infinitely long. Anything not officially tested and approved was forbidden. From the Space Shuttle Food System Summary (only covers the first 25 flights) here's the menu you got to choose from. Don't worry, it's only a couple of weeks at most. From eating this stuff in ...


47

Methods of cleaning Current washing technologies are mostly solvent based. Most normal "soiling" of clothing is a mixture of oils and salts (Both of which are products of sweat), and sloughed skin cells, often bound by those same oils. When one finds clothing irritable from extended wear, it's usually due to the effects of accumulated sweat and skin cells, ...


36

There are in fact many foods astronauts are not allowed to eat. I'll be specifically talking about the ISS as they are the only ones currently in space. Bread: Astronauts are not allowed to eat bread because their crumbs can go into machine and equipment, and into astronauts' eyes. Alcohol: Russians were allowed to drink small quantities of alcohol (such ...


35

I believe used fecal bags from the LM were normally supposed to be transferred back to the CSM and returned with the crew to Earth for analysis. In the Apollo 15 flight journal, in the annotation after 174:14:00, we have this: [As Apollo 15 disappears behind the Moon, Al switches on the Gamma-ray Spectrometer, X-ray Spectrometer and the Alpha Particle ...


33

Towels. Towels are used for this extensively. Hitchhiker's Guide wasn't making this part up, at least. Here's an 10 liter spill soaked up with towels this week. NASA Status report: https://blogs.nasa.gov/stationreport/2019/02/01/iss-daily-summary-report-2-01-2019/ Increasing levels of toilet humor: https://www.engadget.com/2019/02/06/iss-toilet-leak-...


30

Despite Charlie Duke's concern about it, given that the PLSS is massive, and would shift an astronaut's center of gravity far back from their natural distribution, it would be surprising if the designers hadn't anticipated the possibility of a fall. This view of the PLSS shows that the back side of the backpack is almost a single unbroken shell: ...


26

If any of the 12 had a bowel movement and then obeyed procedures, then yes there is poop on the moon My 30+ hour search of Apollo documentation did not reveal a direct answer either way. Perhaps the reason why NASA has never given a direct answer is because "leave poop on the moon" is not good public relations. However, multiple sources indicate detailed ...


24

From the NASA Astronaut Candidate Program brochure: Applicants should be aware that selection as an Graduation from the Astronaut Candidate Program will require successful completion of the following: International Space Station systems training, Extravehicular Activity skills training, Robotics skills training, Russian language training , and aircraft ...


21

I decided to search through NTRS and found this: http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20130012684 Waterless Clothes-Cleaning Machine This machine can be used wherever water is at a premium, or to minimize washing with water. Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center, Houston, Texas A waterless clothes-cleaning machine has been developed that removes loose particulates and ...


21

From Retro Space Images's FaceBook post: Gene Cernan scratches the itch during an Apollo 17 training session at KSC.


21

Many jurisdictions recognize weddings performed out-of-jurisdiction provided that those weddings are legal in the jurisdiction they're performed in. Unfortunately, there's no legal authority with jurisdiction over LEO -- it's kind of a legal gray area. Does any national law system provide a means for marriage officiants to lawfully perform a marriage at ...


21

Consider this dramatization of Apollo 13 as an explanation of why it is probable we don't know what the most heated argument has ever been in space: Astronauts worry about how ground control's perception of their performance will affect their opportunities to fly again. Space agencies worry about how the public's perception ...


20

Several space selfies were made and chances are you already know the very first one Buzz Aldrin took of himself during Gemini 12. The cameras used are large-ish but imagine even holding a shoe box in front of you with thick gloves on: you're still able to point it at yourself in a distance suitable to make a photograph of yourself, provided the lens' focal ...


18

How about Willpower? Every Soldier learns to stand still at a parade or when they got to pledge loyalty. When I had my inauguration at the Austrian Military forces, we all had to stand still for quite some time (2-3 hours no nose or butt scratching) and it wasn't really a problem. Also, if you're concentrated on something serious (like doing work in a ...


17

According to an audio transcript of the Apollo 17 lunar mission, some astronauts had a Velcro patch somewhere on the inside of the helmet to scratch their nose on.


17

tl;dr: The only source found so far is an article that claims that Charlie Duke claims to have left urine on the Moon. No definitive report about fecal matter on the Moon, though. In total, it's claimed by several sources (probably all copying one article) that 96 bags of poop, urine and puke were left on its surface. By my own count from NASA's list (see ...


16

Yes, they can and do watch TV shows on the ISS. From an interview with Scott Kelly aboard the ISS: Apart from posting pictures to Twitter and Instagram, Kelly also said he spends some of his limited downtime watching television. What exactly does a highly trained astronaut watch while orbiting the planet and contemplating the mysteries of life? ...


15

For small spills, crew on board the ISS rely on evaporation to remove water that they can't mop up with towels. The ISS ECLSS (Environment Control and Life Support System), which consists of several components spread around the station, has 2 main components for maintaining the atmosphere: Elektron on the Zvezda module, and the Air Revitalization System (...


13

The primary consideration for pencils is the risk of breaking, and the need for sharpening producing waste products that can be hazards. But let's examine the major factors: Materials, mechanisms, and failure modes. Some terms: nib: the small tube at the working end, past the mechanism. Not all forms have one. The nib is usually a friction fit that aids ...


13

There's a bunch of videos online with a demo of drinking. Specifically for coffee you can watch that here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pk7LcugO3zg According to this post, he uses a special cup that has a specific shape and surface tension. During STS-126 last November, mission specialist Don Pettit devised a cup that took advantage of its special ...


12

I didn't work on the server end of things, but I recall hearing at work that normal Internet streaming doesn't work because the general assumptions made about connections are violated. The latency is long, and connection pathways change often and by extreme amounts. A normal web-app will detect a problem and reset the connection. The software I worked on ...


12

Historically cups have not been used. For spaceflight, liquids have been stored in sealed bag-like containers and then drunk through a tube. These are somewhat similar to how many children's drinks are packaged and stored. This document shows some pictures of these sorts of containers and some food containers. As another answer has said, there have been ...


12

No. SpaceX is a space launch company, not a genetic engineering company. That branch of science lies completely outside their research. Never mind the ethical aspect: the astronauts are volunteers, you don't breed people to produce 'optimal astronauts'! That's not to say if someone (some other company) comes up with this sort of adaptations, and people pick ...


11

Good question, and this is not really an answer to your question I know, but it's too long for a comment. My reaction to reading it was (perhaps strangely) to wonder about even the necessity of clothes in space. It seems to me that on Earth, we wear clothes for a number of reasons (some practical, others more cultural and traditional than any purely ...


11

Current Practice Right now, toilet paper is used (as well as wet wipes). It is disposed of in air-tight bags, according to Smithsonian.com. From the reference provided by Deer Hunter, "toilet wipes are used to wipe not only the person but the receptacle and the seat." It also mentions that the air-tight bags are discarded in a trash container. Future ...


11

Almost certainly not. First of all, astronauts work out for hours every day, specifically to prevent the deterioration of bones and muscles. Moreover, the human energy budget is dominated not by the energy cost of moving around, but by a) maintaining body temperature and b) the brain. Furthermore, just removing gravity from the equation isn't necessarily ...


10

Yes, it is possible. In fact, it's a better solution except for graphite getting into expensive things that don't like graphite. If we think about how a mechanical pencil works, it doesn't involve gravity at all. From here As you can kind of tell from the diagram, the only force that need be involved is that of the top button being depressed. The pencil ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible