We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

38

A controller on Earth, Ed Fendell, manually operated the camera by radio control, knowing the time of liftoff and the ascent trajectory expected and referring to a time-and-angle chart without watching the video feed in real time! According to Fendell: Now, the way that worked was this. Harley Weyer, who worked for me, sat down and figured what the ...


24

Most conventional motion detectors wouldn't work well on Mars. PIR: Usually only works well with warm bodies such as humans and animals. Would probably never trigger on Mars Ultrasonic: Due to the extremely low pressure on Mars any acoustic sensing through the atmosphere would be greatly hindered. These sensors usually only pick up on very large, ...


8

This is not a complete answer, because I haven't identified the video directly, but it has some information which I think should help someone interested in finding it. Camera I am now pretty sure (despite my original answer in the photography SE) that this is footage from one of the Apollo TV cameras. The 16mm film footage is simply higher quality than ...


7

I think a short answer would be yes, but with caveats. Many GoPros have been flown on high-altitude balloons to near-space and in close to vacuum conditions, using completely COTS assemblies (and therefore internal batteries). GoPros also work on the ground in vacuum chambers. At about 02:40: Alright guys, so the ...


7

New Horizons has an object tracker, a star tracker needed for navigation and attitude control. There are two redundant A-STR star trackers. 10 times per second a wide area image of the background is taken and compared to a stored star chart containing 3000 stars. Only bright stars may be used to get an image with a short exposure time. Faint stars and ...


6

I've used a stock GoPro on a high altitude balloon that made it to 40 km, it recorded the whole way up and down (on external power). So depending on your mass and financial budget you could use this camera. At the altitude you're working at the most likely problem you'll have would be the camera over heating due to the lack of air reducing its ability to ...


6

TLDR: It probably would be possible but would only be feasible during the approach phase. In theory the New Horizons probe probably could do so. In practice is would be awkward to implement and would likely negatively impact data collection. New Horizons has two computers (plus one spare for each). The first is "Command and Data Handling" (C&DH) which ...


4

Here is an image of the Apollo 9 multispectral camera mounted to the hatch window. It was used in Earth orbit: Image from this pdf. A color image of the array from this NASA page: Note the different color labels in green, red, brown and black. An front side image of the Apollo 12 camera array was provided by Organic Marble, so I concentrate on the filter ...


4

There's a picture in the Apollo Experience Report - Photographic Equipment..., page 21. This is a guess really - it's out of my wheelhouse - but a note on Page 11 in the document linked above gives the experiment number SO-246 associated with this instrument, and on Page 5 in the Apollo 12 Lunar Photography document linked in the question, SO-246 is stated ...


4

The cameras are just in a pressurized, "factory-sealed" box. The encoder, cameras, and other electronics are enclosed in a box pressurized to approximately one atmosphere, containing dry nitrogen, to provide a level of protection to the electronics from the space environment. Source The pressurized box is mounted on the Columbus module External ...


4

The Closed Circuit TV (CCTV) cameras in the Space Shuttle Payload bay had optical zoom lenses. Zoom capability magnifies or reduces the size of objects in a camera's field of view by adjusting the focal length of the lens. The minimum focus for standard lenses is 3 feet, the maximum is infinity. (emphasis mine, reference) (personal photo of camera ...


4

The video camera on the Apollo LRV had zoom, used in the well-known Apollo 17 liftoff footage.


3

Since no one has answered yet, I'd like to add some helpful information here that's too long to fit as a comment. Note that the spacecraft was rotating backwards from what would have been desired. I stacked the images that show Ultima Thule and re-registered them to remove that rotation. Green dots mark stars (present in multiple frames) and red dots ...


3

The Apollo missions 11, 12, 14, 15, 16 and 17 were equiped with Lunar Surface Hasselblad Data Camera for each of the astronauts during their Moon walk. These cameras were equipped with a 60 mm lens. The missions 14, 15, 16 and 17 used a third camera equipped with a 500 mm lens. See this Apollo Image Libraries. Magazines used with the 500 mm lens are listed ...


3

This isn't a complete answer, but I think there should be at least some doubt cast on this story: it's certainly not as clear as a lot of people think it is. The Wikipedia entry for this lens claims that it was developed in 1966. So we can wonder what it might have been used for. It is generally claimed that it was used (or designed) for pictures of the ...


2

....were rectangular lenses used? I don't think so. Currently I haven't found absolute proof, but from what I found in the paper below: From Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC) Instrument Overview update: also available here (not paywalled, thanks to @organicmarble's comment) and discussed further below: The visible lens has a 6.0 mm focal length ...


2

Since there's still not an answer yet, I thought I'd offer a partial answer by addressing one of your suggested areas of focus. What particularly desirable frequencies are missing? To determine what is "desirable", let's compare to another Jupiter orbiter: Galileo. Galileo also had a CCD, the Solid-State Imager (SSI), which operated in the spectral range ...


1

Here's a few GoPro Hero 4 Blacks powered by Brunton All Day 2.0 battery packs according to The Record Player Built for Space; How an independent record label launched the first vinyl into the stratosphere. The article says that the camera cases (standard GoPro?) were modified to take in audio and prevent fogging. Don't forget about fogging! Screenshot ...


1

Excellent answer Alex, thank you. For the technical implementation aspect I'd like to add 2 points: it might be possible to forgo taxing the cpu and not processing full resolution LORRI images in defining the target as a region at least a few pixels across and sampling a raster. as there's already 2 star trackers in there, I imagine adapting one for the ...


1

So, the other answer establishes the least-disruptive motion sensor is using motion analysis software on the camera feeds. Doing the processing on the ground is easy enough, but we don't receive enough images for this. Curiosity does not repeatedly image the same scene. If you want to do that, the amount of transmitted data goes up, and in another ...


1

I fear there is not much room left for substantial improvements of the resolution of L'LORRI. Optical limits for angular resolution of such a camera did not change during these 15 years. Weight limits are still very narrow. Increasing the image sensor pixel count only would very slightly increase the weight of the camera, but does not change the maximal ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible