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20

I think it's important to understand the timeline here. The footage we've all been amazed by was acquired by a collection of slightly-hardened small, light, high-quality commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) cameras, helped by a fast, very-low-power processor (I think a Qualcomm SnapDragon: this processor is much faster than Perseverance's main processors!) and ...


4

I guess it adds to the weight and was not considered mission critical, Short: You answered the question on your own. Long: You answered the question on your own. Remember KISS! Keep It Simple and Stupid! PS: I think they should have been able to fit them on. "Be able to do something" is not equal with "It is reasonable to do something"


15

Will the HiRes camera of the Chinese orbiter be capable of seeing the shadows of the US landers and rovers on Mars? tl;dr: Yes it can, IF it passes over one of them, and at the right time of day for shadow-making! But chances are low that they're going to waste time doing that. They have to put a rover safely on the surface and so they will be targeting ...


4

The cameras were added so that the engineers can see if everything happened as expected and to inform the technology of future landings. They also serve a public relations use: While extensive reconstruction of the entire EDL sequence can be done based on telemetry and MEDLI2 data, some phenomena of EDL are best depicted through sight and ...


1

The LORRI sensor has a resolution of θ = 5µrad or 1 arcsec per pixel. We can do a simple geometric approach to see which distance x corresponds to a change in the apparent position of a nearby star (say d = 8 ly) of one pixel. This is simply $\sin \theta \cdot d = x = 2.5~\rm AU$. That would be the position precision, if the position of at least 2 nearby ...


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