7

You're right; these objects aren't lost. However, Space-Track doesn't actually track a lot of higher-orbiting objects. They just don't seem particularly interested in anything with a multi-day orbit; I don't know why. Of the four objects you mention, TESS and IBEX are tracked by the people operating those missions. I know of no public data for IBEX, ...


4

Answering almost a year later... This was a particularly hard launch for JSPOC to track. The systems, processes, databases, etc are not well set up for a launch with a hundred+ objects. It looks like a year later, 43822 still shows up as Object BS, and there are several other equally unidentified objects: Object X (43779), Object BE (43810), and others. ...


1

As I mentioned in a comment, without source at the time... SATCAT numbers 70000-99999 (70'000s, 80'000s, and 90'000s) are "analyst objects". This article from The Space Review indicates that these ranges had special uses, from the very beginning of the SATCAT: When the SATCAT was first setup, all of the information was being kept in one large database ...


1

I can't answer you fully why Celestrak is wrong, but the correct number is 44972. It seems like this was updated in the other source. New objects are around 45000 right now, they shouldn't be much larger than that.


1

@RussellBorogove's comment is fairly conclusive. ...I note that Celestrak was established in 1985, at which point Salyut 7 was up, but Skylab was not. The Archived TLE data page says 1980-2004, but there's a link to request earlier data. Skylab reentered the atmosphere before 1980 and Tiangong-1 and Tiangong-2 were both launched after 2004. And, as ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible