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Venus has no Magnetic field and it has a thicker atmosphere than any other terrestrial planet. Which is a direct counterexample to the statement that lack of magnetic field is what makes it impossible to retain an atmosphere, and even if there were a direct causality between the two there are ways to build an artificial magnetosphere. Mars' shallow gravity ...


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According to some reports a human can survive at up to ~5 gravities Humans can survive well over 5 gs for briefer periods. In nominal orbital flights crews have taken over 7g on ascent for short periods of time (Titan-Gemini) and higher forces very briefly on reentry. From Earth it takes about 10 minutes to get into orbit; we can expect it would be a ...


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TLDR: No, once Mars is inhabited, it should remain inhabited forever. First, the current answer is that the mission has already ended, since the Mars One organization has failed to produce a feasible plan to raise funds for a believable process to get there. Second, no, Mars One had a plan which included sending four additional astronauts arriving every 26 ...


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Yes, we have found evidence for carbonaceous chondrites on the Moon. Apollo 15 and 17 both brought back samples of lunar rock that had hydrogen inclusions with an isotopic ratio that exactly matches that of the water in carbonaceous chondrites. See the cite below for details. Hydrogen Isotopes in Lunar Volcanic Glasses and Melt Inclusions Reveal a ...


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Not the same kind of geothermal but - Ground source heat pumps, aka geothermal heat pumps could have potential uses for heating and cooling of habitat buildings. These things use the ground as a heat sink and heat source. They are also reversible so that cooling of buildings adds heat to rock and earth around the pipework, which can later be recovered (with ...


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You would not need to use water! You could use the methane and other hydrocarbons that could be used. They have much lower freezing points.


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I've asked the same question, but I believe it comes down to that there is no sweet spot in the atmosphere of Venus where the pressure is good (0.1 - 1.0 atm), the winds aren't bad and the amount of sulfuric acid isn't thick. Around 45-50 km above the surface, the pressure is around Earth sea-level, but the winds are 200+ kmph and thick with sulfuric acid!...


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