5

Anton must really love chemistry or pain. NASA's CEA is a robust tool for analyzing combustion thermo-chemistry which was developed by the same Gordon & McBride mentioned in Anton's answer while they were working at NASA. They also make MATLAB wrappers for the thing, but I'm not sure where to find a publicly available option. It will save you a ...


4

To an old timer like me who was one of the pioneers in much of the rocket engine research during the Saturn V F-1 engine development at Princeton University (around 1966 – 71), I’m glad to see renewed public interest in these topics. My feelings are that the private rocket companies now-a-days are doing some good things with their new designs and strategies. ...


3

The reason you can't finish your calculations is that you are missing half of the engine. You are going to have to make some decisions about the nozzle in order to get exhaust velocity. I'll make some decisions for you and show you how to work through it. Your engine's design altitude is going to be 11.8 km. This means that your nozzle exit plane pressure is ...


3

You will need to write a solver for the incomplete combustion of your propellant. This can be done by hand, but I recommend writing a program to implement it. These days, such calculations are primarily done by solving for the maximum entropic state of the system (the system being the mixture of reactants at the chamber temperature & pressure). The ...


3

There are different numbers on this NASA page about Saturn V: Finally, the fuel squirted through 3 700 orifices into the combustion chamber to mix with the oxidizer, which entered through 2 600 other orifices in the injector face If the hole numbers of the question are correct, (1428 Oxidizer holes and (approximately) 1404 Fuel (RP1) holes) the explanation ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible