35

First of all, it can require a lot of computer power to compute trajectories if they involve multiple gravitational slinghots to reduce fuel usage. This isn't because computing each segment is hard but because the search space is at least potentially exponential in the number of gravitational slingshots. I am pretty sure that this is what the thing in The ...


18

All that computing power is not dedicated to the Artemis project. As you quote in the body of your question, The new supercomputer will be used by more than 1,500 scientists and engineers from across the country, including on projects like developing a more efficient quadcopter or simulating the inside of our sun. Not all of this computing power is ...


10

Does the "modeling and simulations of the entry, decent and landing to the moon" really need 46,000+ cores, 3.69 petaflops and 221 TB of memory? No. A machine with the power of a Raspberry Pi is good enough for solving some simulation problems. A nice desktop machine will have more than enough oomph for solving many, many more simulation problems. On the ...


10

It has been used all the way to the edge of the solar system: Pioneer 10 and 11 used core memory. Voyager 1 and 2 use plated-wire memory (a variation of core memory). Viking 1 and 2 used plated-wire memory.


9

The IBM AP-101S used as the flight computer on the Space Shuttle in the latter part of the program was known to ops personnel as the General Purpose Computer (GPC). Each of the 5 GPCs in the Data Processing System (DPS) had 256k (yes k) of CMOS memory. This memory was volatile and prone to corruption by radiation (Single Event Upsets, SEUs). Thus there ...


8

They will help Artemis, but not how you might think Experience with the Apollo program tells us how much computing power it takes to get to the moon. The spacecraft itself was controlled by the Apollo Guidance Computer, which had an instruction set, instruction speed, and memory space somewhat comparable to the microcontroller inside a microwave oven today....


7

The National Archives website has the stock footage for the NASA documentary "This is Mission Control". In the footage they show closeup shots of several screen in the MOCR and the staff support rooms. The footage is from October 1970, so it's probably safe to assume the screens show data for an Apollo 14 simulation run. Here are two examples from it. Lunar ...


6

These are the best I've seen. They are from the recent restoration of the Apollo MOCR but are accurate AFAIK. Source: https://wordpress.accuweather.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/mission-control-7.jpg


5

In general, the astronauts could operate the spacecraft autonomously without help from mission control. Specifically, you could land on the far side of the moon. The Apollo spacecraft each had a guidance computer, but these were considerably limited in program memory and processing speed. The difficult calculations were performed on IBM mainframes back in ...


5

The HPE Apollo was installed on the ISS as part of this experiment: High Performance Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Computer System on the ISS (Spaceborne Computer) - 09.19.18 According to news reports, the computer will return to Earth on SpaceX CRS-17 in February or March of 2019 (e.g, this November 1, 2018 Fast Company report): With three or four ...


5

There's at least one projector that gets used for movies. From the ISS National Laboratory blog post Movie Night on the International Space Station: NASA astronaut, Joe Acaba, posted this image showing the crew relaxing together while watching a movie. According to him “I can’t think of a better movie theater to watch Star Wars than on the Space Station!” ...


4

Upper left: KSC control room for the Instrument Unit during the launch of Apollo 8. I am not sure if this is the Launch Control Center Firing Room or a back room. I think a back room. (reference) Upper right - the Instrument Unit itself as described in this answer Lower left - Launch Control Center Firing Room at KSC, looking away from the window (the ...


4

That appears to be the description of the Block 1. The Block 2 is the one with 36 kilowords of memory. It additionally seems to be wrong about the number of bits in the Bank register. https://www.ibiblio.org/apollo/Block1.html#CPU_Architecture_Registers has the Block 1 details, and states that the high 5 bits of the Bank register are used. https://www....


3

The same way all space electronics are radiation hardened. Shielding it directly is not the only way to protect electronics. Instead, radiation-resistant hardware (such as silicon-on-insulator transistors) and logical systems (EDAC/Error Detection And Correction or ECC/Error Correcting Code). Triple Modular Redundancy is really common as well, where three ...


3

Background for people unfamiliar with core rope: The Apollo Guidance Computer used core ropes for high-density read-only memory (which they called fixed memory). Like regular erasable core memory, core rope used magnetic cores, small ferrite rings. But unlike erasable cores, it stored many bits per core. The trick was to put many wires through each core, ...


2

What could be the complete internal architecture of my payload's OBDH system? I would use a Raspberry Pi model 3b+, connected to a camera module. You may run the latest version of Raspbian (a Linux flavor based on Debian) and configure the startup scripts to start streaming footage. Which processor should I use for fast processing, less power budget? ...


1

The Apollo flight computers where quite heavy, and consumed a fair amount of power (32kg and 55 watts). While not a game changer even small mass savings in the batteries and hardware could be of significant use. If you open the question up to non flight hardware then yes. Being able to model the complex fluid, combustion and other dynamics could have led to ...


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