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2

The ISRO had two fully solid fuelled launch systems called the Satellite Launch Vehicle ( SLV ) and Augmented Satellite Launch Vehicle ( ASLV ). SLV was a four stage launch vehicle with a payload capacity of 40kg to LEO and ASLV was 5 stage with 150kg to LEO. Both launch vehicles were considered as experimental and never intended to have a long service life. ...


6

ISAS, now a part of JAXA, has a long history of using solid fuel to launch scientific satellites. Eight different vehicles, not including the SS-520.


10

The SS-520 is a solid fuel rocket and is described in detail in my answer to Do launchers using only solid propellant exist? SS-520-5 has put the Tricom cubesat into orbit, therefore it also qualifies as a "completely solid fuelled orbital rocket". The second attempt at becoming the smallest orbital launching rocket was made on 3 February 2018. ...


18

There have been a few purely solid-fuel orbital rockets over the years. The first was the Scout from 1961; the only ones in current use are the Long March 11 and the Minotaur/Minotaur-C family. There are more "nearly-pure" solid-fuel rockets such as the Shavit-2. These use three or more solid-fuel stages to get into an orbit, and then a liquid-...


8

I can't say how all-solid launchers compare cost-wise with liquid or mixed launchers, but they're viable. The Minotaur I and Minotaur IV rockets are all-solid, four-stage orbital launchers. The R&D and production costs for the Minotaurs were offset to some degree by the use of converted ICBMs. The Vega rocket is a 4-stage orbital launcher with solid ...


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