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26

After the pointy-shaped object leaves, the remaining blunt-nosed rocket will experience dramatically enhanced structural loading and possibly aerodynamic instability. They expect a "rapid scheduled disassembly" in flight, but if that does not happen they will either let it blow up when it hits the ocean, or blow it up as @RussellBorogove suggests if it ...


3

I'm not quite sure what the documentary you saw was referring to in particular, but it seems likely that Galina Balashova's design work in the Soviet space program is relevant. From the article: Notably, she integrated a lack of gravity into her design, choosing dark colors for the floor and bright colors for the ceiling. There was an important ...


8

TL;DR: you'll almost certainly die in the accident, or asphyxiate afterwards. Will your spacesuit keep you alive long enough to be rescued? You've got, what, 8 hours max? Maybe a bit more, if you can relax? Unless there's a suitable vehicle immediately ready and able to rescue you that's aware of your plight, you're space junk. If you weren't in a re-...


4

I think it's just barely possible that 1850s technology could achieve a crewed suborbital launch above the Kármán line, similar to the first crewed Mercury missions, but that anything beyond that would not be possible. Without modern rocket engines, the best propulsion option is a black powder rocket. This has a specific impulse of about 80 seconds (a ...


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