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11

The answer is yes, it can used to re-boost the ISS. According to the information in spaceflightinsider.com and in rocket.com Aerojet Rockedyne site in the RCS engines paragraph, in a declaration of Terry Lorier, Aerojet Rocketdyne’s CST-100 service module propulsion system program manager, are confirmed the capabilities of Boeing CST-100 Starliner ...


8

If you look at the SpaceX design, you see that there are the large touch screen displays. But there are also standard physical buttons for manual controls. As noted in the comments, while under thrust at 3-5G's a touch screen just isn't going to cut it. Additionally, Dragon V2 is meant to have an almost entirely automated flight regime. The crew are not ...


7

Anything that goes into space needs to be robust enough to withstand cosmic rays. That's why computer chips that go into space are usually of the older variety with thicker connections. Mechanical devices such as buttons and switches are more intuitive. You can feel them when they click into place. They don't change what they do because someone updated the ...


7

From the wiki on the NASA Docking System: Once mated the NDS interface can transfer power, data, commands, air, communication and in future implementations will be able to transfer water, fuel, oxidiser and pressurant as well.[1] So they could certainly top off their charge if they need to (assuming they have a NDS installed by the time CST-100 gets ...


7

It's not even a discount. Sometimes it's just moral support. Every NASA space center that involves dangerous activities has a select few restaurants and bars that everyone knows by name. The same goes for Navy and Air Force bases that involve dangerous activities. For example, there is no Building Zero on the JSC campus (building numbers start at one, which ...


7

As posted in a comment, the most likely contribution of a motel/restaurant to a manned space program is a discount on rooms or food. To be more specific, this specific plaque is almost certainly a reference to food/lodging related to the April 3/May 2, 2012 drop tests of Boeing's CST-100 crew capsule. Evidence: The picture in the background of the plaque ...


7

A big difference is that Lockheed Martin has spent a lot of money on radiation management in the Orion vehicle. That is, they have looked at shielding, placement of bulkheads, food and water storage, etc, so as to quantify the level of radiation you would take in the vehicle. Also, should there be a solar storm, where is the safe spot in the vehicle, and ...


6

They might be externally alike (as in design/looks), but they are very different spacecrafts. CST-100's design is for commercial use, and for use within LEO, whereas Orion is intended for use beyond LEO. This alone involves a lot of differences between the spacecrafts, such as heat shield design (Orion needs a more resistant heat shield for entrances from ...


5

No, two incompatible systems are used on the ISS. (For docking...many other incompatible systems are used as well). The FGB could dock to the PMA because the FGB has an APAS (Androgynous Peripheral Attachment System)** on one end of it. The other Russian docking ports don't have this system, they use a probe and drogue mechanism. ** The shuttles used an ...


5

Orion was designed to be able to support travel beyond LEO but instead of trying to add everything asked for to the base module (think space shuttle) they kept the capsule itself small and focused [1]. Instead of adding features to the capsule there are multiple proposals to dock with an additional module in space to extend capability: Proposed Androgynous ...


5

According to the NASA Administrator if the crew had been present, yes. "This anomaly has to do with automation," Bridenstine said. "Nicole [Mann] and Mike [Fincke] are trained specifically to deal with the situation that happened today, where the automation was not working according to plan." Source Presumably this means that an onboard crew could ...


5

I sincerely doubt this is "dust" of any kind. It looks and behaves like the classic sensor noise that is visible any time an image sensor is used at high gain. Noise in this case is typically described as random fluctuations in the voltage levels recorded by the image sensing system caused by factors such as local heat and variations between sensor pixels. ...


5

This was briefly discussed in the Dec 21 press briefing. It wasn’t a gap in the sense of “no radio waves here”. Rather, since the craft was confused about what time it was and hence what attitude it should be maintaining, it was also using antennae that weren’t optimal for acquiring the signal. The signal acquisition was slowed down due the resulting low ...


4

There should be enough supply of everything needed for life support. Oxygen at first, but also the absorbers needed for the removal of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere in the spacecraft. Water for drinking will be also important, sometimes also used for cooling of the spacecraft. Spare filters for cleaning the atmosphere, removing dust and odors. ...


4

Orion as a capsule will have an actual Service Module attached. It is being provided by ESA, as a highly modified version of the ATV cargo transport. This is a pretty large add on, and provides both fuel for engines for maneuvering and supplies for the crew. Dragon and Starliner do not have quite the same Service Module. Dragon has a trunk, which in the ...


3

When this kind of compatibility is required, they mostly mean mechanically, vibrations and things like that. The software isn't written, nor the conops, and other tests haven't likely been done. In theory, however, this allows one to, in the event of a major issue, launch on another rocket, with some work. I strongly suspect Crew Dragon is rated for at least ...


3

Scott Manley speculates they were trying to avoid hitting themselves. Because the launch trajectory was so low the altitude at burn out was still inside the atmosphere. He speculates the engineers were concerned aerodynamic forces might cause the boosters to "recontact" the spacecraft. So they held on to them until they were at a higher altitude where ...


2

The other thing to consider is in the zero gravity environment of outer space you don't want a floating or a fast flying item to accidentally hit a touch panel and inadvertently activate any of the craft's controls.


2

Short principle-based answer: Yes They both use a Low Impact Docking System, so what one could dock with the other could too. For that matter, they could dock with eachother. Here's the principle based part; Ever tried to hook up an old monitor to a new computer? Maybe you have DVI cable for your TV but an HDMI cable on your cable box? Adapters are cheap ...


1

Yes, the FAA does in fact still certify parachute packers ('parachute riggers' is the specific term), who receive ratings based on the types of parachutes they are trained to pack. However, the FAA certifications (there are two levels, senior/entry-level and master) that are offered are typically used for packing skydiving parachutes, rather than for space ...


1

It is the volume problem that must be solved to leave LEO. LEO means you can be resupplied and abort back to Earth in an emergency. With Cis lunar or farther you have a series of non-linear scaling problems that go in a step-wise fashion that greatly increase mass and volume required to "bring everything with you". Neither of these can be expanded in a ...


1

The ISS crew cargo craft do not have real facilities for long term stays. There is no washroom for example. Of course any serious beyond-LEO mission in a capsule will likely include a hab module of some kind which is not something CST-100 or Dragon is excluded from. Gwynne Shotwell in discussing Red Dragon mentioned that deep space communication systems ...


1

The Orion emergency escape system is of the old Apollo pull rocket and shroud system. The CST-100 has a more modern pusher RS-88 rocket system for emergency escape. The CST-100 is designed to be reusable while the Orion is a one use space craft.


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