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3

I think this is a great question, still relevant now. This is an addendum to the answers already provided by Hobbes and iKrase. Technical Whilst I think the factors Hobbes has identified are spot on for the space industry in general the quality requirements on a cubesat structure basically come down to "don't get stuck in the launch pod" and "...


2

That's really not an exorbitant price at all for high quality metal parts, with anodizing and plating, produced in small quantity. it looks like there's a reasonable number of parts in the CubeSat frame and some of them don't look super simple.


4

I do not think an answer can be provided, or at least would be quite hard, for the question as stated. I do not know what is a current popular belief about prices and can not rate the level of misconception. Furthermore, different CubeSat projects can cost very differently. My answer will focus on prices, not beliefs of prices. Distinction has to be made ...


3

Most of the CubeSats have Electrical Power System (EPS) as a dedicated module on a single PC104 like PCB. Depending on the required capacity of the secondary (rechargeable) batteries, they can be housed on the same PCB or as additional modules. Solar cell arrays, with bypass (required in case of cell shadowing and failures) and blocking (stopping from ...


5

The answer depends on what kind of orientation the satellite needs. If the goal is to know satellite's orientation relative to the Sun (so it can, for example, turn the side with the biggest solar panels towards the Sun for charging), then one Sun sensor is sufficient. Though many sensors would help in having knowledge of the orientation all the time, ...


5

You only need two, cf. section 3.10.1 "Attitude Estimation Overview" in Schaub and Junkins 3rd edition. Note that each attitude observation is in the form of a unit direction vector. Thus, a single attitude observation will only provide information on two degrees of rotational freedom. Although the observation vector is a three-dimensional vector, ...


5

If re-entry heat destroys most of the cubesat, leaving only the circuit board intact, its flat shape will likely make it tumble and flutter down to earth intact, at a low terminal velocity, without much more heating or aerodynamic load. You could directly measure that speed (at least near the earth, where atmosphere is denser) by dropping it from a big kite ...


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