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2

This started out as a comment on 3), but this should be a rough answer by now. This means exactly what it says on the tin. They have been observed for so long that we have accurate enough data on them to not confuse them with other objects. They are not in the process of being identified as belonging to a specific launch. The cracks in the surveillance ...


6

A protective cap As scientists in the control center eagerly awaited color images from Venus, sad news was announced, "There is a strong signal, but no modulation." All of the protective caps had failed to come off. After the problems on Venera-9 and 10, the caps had been redesigned, but now the results were even worse. An intensive study later determined ...


4

Never. They are distributed over too wide an area to efficiently collect them. The amount of fuel required by your 'robotic space tug' alone will probably counter all advantages. They are individual and very specific instruments; each would require a different dismantling procedure, leaving you only with the option of shredding and possibly melting them. ...


5

Are there any documented cases of satellites, planes, or space stations ruining astronomical science? A similar case that comes to mind is Project Westford. In that occasion, the backlash from the scientific community started the need for scientists to participate in the planning and evaluation of outer space projects. Sir Bernard Lovell of the Jodrell ...


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