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1

I see two main things throwing off your calculations: You can not simply subtract the velocity of one planet from another to get interplanetary transfer costs. An optimal transfer consists of an elliptic orbit touching the orbit of the inner planet at perihelion, and the outer planet at aphelion. Thus, the numbers you should try to obtain are the ...


0

What you're asking here is how to take into account waste variables such as gravity loss, aero-forces, and ISP loss at sea level. These all depend on your rocket's specific flight profile. For example, rockets with high thrust to weight ratios will experience less loss due to gravity, but much greater loss due to air resistance. Your thrust to weight ratio ...


4

The rocket equation is meant to work with constant specific impulse. If you want to stay with the Rocket Equation, you can 'split' any stage into more 'virtual' stages (where the initial mass of the next stage is equal arbitrarily chosen dry mass of the previous one), find what delta-V you need to reach roughly 10km altitude and generate a 'virtual' stage ...


12

I've got a set of Keplerian orbital elements $e_0$, $a_0$, $i_0$, $\omega_0$, $\Omega_0$, and $\theta_0$, and I'd like to get to a different orbit with orbital elements $e$, $a$, $i$, $\omega$, $\Omega$, and $\theta$. How do I calculate (a) the amount of delta-v I'll need for this maneuver or set of maneuvers, and (b) which maneuver or set of maneuvers I ...


9

What you're looking for is Lambert's problem, which is used both for trajectory design and orbit determination, and to produce porkchop plots. Your hunch that this is not a simple problem is correct. pykep has a solver for Lambert's problem that supports multiple revolutions as well as solvers for various related problems such as low-thrust trajectories.


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