20

Short answer: 8 For great info on available ports, check out this question on ISS Docking ports. I will link in the awesome picture from that question here. The Russian segment has 4 docking ports. The ATV is out of service, but that port is used by Soyuz and Progress, plus the other three ports. The US segment has 4 ports. Where the HTV is berthed ...


19

Yes and no. The current X-37 as flown by the US Air Force is not equipped with any docking ports (PMA, CBM or APAS) as described by @geoffc, nor does it have an attachment for the SSRMS (aka Canadarm) to grab it. However, Boeing, the manufacturer, have published designs that would permit it to be so equipped at some future time. These plans are described in ...


18

Considering how all the usual docking/berthing ports at the station are occupied, Santa would likely arrive in a Dragon Crew/V2 or a Boeing CST-100 vehicle. These are the next US vehicles that will be manned and due for first launches in 2019. The Russian side uses their own style of docking port that Progress, Soyuz, and the ESA ATV vehicles dock. These ...


14

The outer hatch of the airlock in the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) of the International Space Station (ISS) can be operated electrically. Note that this particular airlock is designed to move equipment, not personnel, in and out of the ISS. The maximum size of an item that can pass through this airlock is 576 mm x 830 mm x 800 mm. The outer hatch can ...


12

Fig. 35 View showing active EFBM The "JPM/C2-09" marker is a dead giveaway: Its Kibo! JPM here means "JEM Pressurized Module" (with JEM being Japanese Experiment Module, the original name of Kibo). Here is a good image showing Kibo, taken in the Space Station Processing Facility, where it rests on a workstand during pre-assembly measurement activities on ...


12

ESA has a doc about the design of the docking ports (IDS - Internation Docking Standard, sometimes also called NDS NASA Docking System, sometimes called LIDS - Low Impact Docking System. Though technically LIDS became NDS which fulfills the IDS standard). On page 3 it says for the IDS ports, design goal is 30 cycles. For the CBM ports, a NASA Tech Doc ...


11

The answer is yes, it can used to re-boost the ISS. According to the information in spaceflightinsider.com and in rocket.com Aerojet Rockedyne site in the RCS engines paragraph, in a declaration of Terry Lorier, Aerojet Rocketdyne’s CST-100 service module propulsion system program manager, are confirmed the capabilities of Boeing CST-100 Starliner ...


11

The International Space Station's PMA docking adapters and Tiangong-1 both use passive APAS-95 docking adapters for spaceship operations; the ISS additionally uses CBM connectors for connecting modules (including most supply spacecraft) and Soyuz probe-and-drogue connectors for Russian modules and craft. To cover your scenarios: Connecting two APAS ...


10

I am not aware of any structural dynamics tests conducted on the ISS using crewmembers as 'excitation sources'. However, the ISS does have a build-in structural dynamics sensor system consisting of accelerometers and strain gauges. This paper describes some early tests where a laser imaging system was also used. Jet firings and spacecraft dockings ...


8

Look at Santa's sleigh. See anything resembling a docking collar? No?--then why do you think he has any use for a docking port?? It's obvious he gets there via EVA. The ISS airlocks aren't blocked. Given his normal speed of travel it's pretty obvious he's not simply breathing the ambient air as he flies anyway, it's perfectly reasonable to figure that ...


8

A yaw thruster failed on in the Gemini's Orbital Attitude and Maneuvering System (OAMS) causing the attitude problems. Suspecting the Agena target to be at fault, they undocked, which made it worse because the spacecraft mass was now much less. The fix was to turn off the OAMS and switch to the redundant Re-entry Control System (RCS). This disabled the ...


8

The ISS has 3 basic docking port types. 2 PMA's - used by Shuttle. With addition of LIDS adapter (coming on SpaceX CRS-7 in June 2015) the CST-100 and Dragon Crew will dock to it. 2 CBM ports - HTV, Dragon Cargo, Cygnus, and ISS modules berth to these. 4 APAS ports - Russian segment has 4 ports. ATV, Soyuz, and Progress use these. You can see a description ...


7

First off, here's a picture (source: NASA) of the inside of the MIR node with something connected in every direction: There's also a video here where the node is traversed, but I can't find any pictures from before all the ports were occupied. It's not particularly spacious, but in the picture only one cone-shaped drogue hatch cover is clearly visible, as ...


7

Maybe this cross section is more what you are looking for? From here.


7

Currently all future NASA plans for spacecraft use androgynous docking ports. In the commercial cargo to ISS program, the SpaceX Dragon craft uses the NDS (NASA docking system) which is androgynous and follows international docking standards. NASA's next generation of crewed spaceflight, in the form of the commercial crew program has both Boeing's CST ...


6

Looks like the info you seek is in the International Docking Standard. Dimensions are in millimeters.


6

The IDA was never meant for mass production: they needed just 2 for the ISS, and they knew long beforehand when they needed them. So they knew they could spend 2 years building them without impacting the schedule. They built the things by hand, took their time testing them etc. This is labor-intensive, and labor costs money. To reduce the build time, you ...


6

While I can't speak with authority on the motivation behind design decisions made years ago, it's worth pointing out that port and starboard docking ports on Zvezda would create conflicts with the Zvezda solar arrays, the FGB solar arrays, the HRS radiators, and the solar array wings. In fact, if you look throughout the station, the only docking and ...


6

Their name seems to be "Motorized Bolt Assembly", this is what they look like: The servo is in the rectangular box marked BMA, the bolt extends through the fine guide cone. More about the BMA (PDF page 89-102): The Moog Space Station Bolt Motor Actuator (BMA) is a rotary actuator comprised of a brushless DC motor, controller, and 120V DC-DC power ...


6

Depends on the definition of usage, there are one or two systems in use as of the time of this question. Between November 2011 and June 2013, Tiangong-1 Target Vehicle had been visited by three Shenzhou spacecraft. Those spacecraft used an androgynous docking mechanism. However, it is not clear whether it is compatible with APAS-89/95. It is worth to ...


6

Prior to ASTP, both Apollo and Soyuz spacecraft used a probe-and-drogue docking system, which requires different hardware at each end of the docking interface. This means that if you want two spacecraft to dock with the same space station, for example, the spacecraft can't dock with each other. In order to support ship-to-ship docking, therefore, an all-...


6

For the time being, the status of regions of interest on celestial bodies remains res nullius. I.e. there is no ownership rights, no state can claim exclusive access or otherwise prohibit other states, or state regulated parties from exploring such regions. This was drafted in the resolution of the United Nations General Assembly in Declaration of Legal ...


5

I read in a forum post on NASASpaceflight.com that cargo and visiting vehicles are eating up 27% of overall crew time. That is a surprisingly large number. Infrastructure is hard. We forget all those people behind the scenes filling the shelves in the supermarket. The context where this came up was in relation to the CRS-2 contract, where NASA wants only 4 ...


5

The major claimed advantage of the APAS was that it can be applied to more massive vehicles because it incorporates a damping system. Buran was going to be much more massive than Soyuz. Source: United We Orbit


4

The "porch" (formally the JEM-EF (Japanese Experiment Module - Exposed Facility)) had a matching connector on it that mated with the connector in the pictures above. This picture shows the shuttle arm holding the JEM-EF and the mating connector. The coarse alignment guides on the two connectors interface with each other; the circles are electrical and data ...


3

As far as I can tell, because of the Z-1 Truss (or S0 truss) on top of Unity (Node 1) there is no safe path for a module or vehicle to approach. Rassvet became important as an extension of the earth facing port of Zarya, as the PLM was berthed to the earth facing port on Unity, effectively blocking direct access to the port. But Rassvet provides ...


3

This is how Spacex's previous dragon spacecraft got docked to the ISS. Canadarm2 would grab dragon and pull it to dock to the ISS See the Dragon Wikipedia page: For the ISS Dragon cargo flights, the ISS's Canadarm2 grapples its Flight-Releasable Grapple Fixture and berths Dragon to the station's US Orbital Segment using a Common Berthing Mechanism.


2

All of the authoratitive information about the apollo-soyuz project can be found in the official NASA history documents. Are these what you are looking for? (I do note that some of the schematic diagrams have been elided from that history document, but are probably still in the print version.)


2

After doing some further research in the NASA photo archives I discovered the hatch actuator is actually a round socket containing a square peg mounted near the collar of the docking mechanism. This correlates with the location of the interior hatch actuator handle being on the body of the spacecraft and not built into the hatch itself. It can be seen in ...


2

One of the docking systems in use on the ISS is a passive APAS-95 system. Tiangong-2 is believed to also have a passive APAS-95 system or something mechanically compatible. In order for two APAS-95 adapters to connect, at least one of them needs to be an active adapter, so Tiangong-2 can't dock with the ISS, but a Shenzhou spacecraft could probably dock ...


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