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18

As I am not privy to the contractual interactions between NASA and SpaceX, I cannot say with an absolute certainty that NASA and SpaceX had astronauts, pilots, etc. evaluate the vehicle beforehand with multiple simulators and used the Cooper-Harper rating scale to evaluate the quality of the human-machine interface and the controllability of the vehicle. On ...


5

Dragon 2 is fully autonomous. It has to be because the same platform is used for crew and cargo missions, and obviously, there is no crew on a cargo mission. Dragon 2 can be manually controlled, but that is considered a contingency scenario. Manual control was tested during the Demo-2 mission, but it is not expected to be used normally. To my knowledge, this ...


4

Sorry, I can't truly answer the main question, as I don't have access to that information. This is more of a general answer to OP's statement: you can't reliably tell whether your input has been registered or not. With a physical button, you always know if you pressed it or not. With a touchscreen, it can be more ambiguous. In fact, the same can be true of ...


4

Assuming this simulation is correct, and I have no reason to doubt that it is, there is in fact true 6 degrees of freedom of movement possible. I do recall that at least one of the axis has less control, but I can't find the news report that states how the manual control felt according to the astronauts...


3

Dragon’s landing parachute is stowed roughly in the nose cone hinge area, and this leads me to believe the nose cone has to open for the chute to deploy. That belief is incorrect. Other than both being installed near the top of the vehicle, the parachutes and the nose cone have nothing to do with each other. In normal operations, I believe the nose cone is ...


3

On Earth, under a 1G gravity field, dust, crap, mites, etc fall to the ground. You can vacuum and clean as much as you want, but the damn stuff gets everywhere. And vehicles like this have lots of nooks and crannies. Remove gravity, inject lots of shake, rattle, and roll of launch, then orbital maneuvers, all sorts of unexpected bits and pieces will pop up ...


2

This may be of help to you: Planetary Mission Entry Vehicles Quick Reference Guide. Version 3.0. It contains lots of data on various entry probes (including ballistic coefficients) although it only goes up until 2003 (MER-A & MER-B).


2

The SpaceX In-Flight Abort webcast (3:14 in vid, T+2:45) announcer says that the Dragon capsule uses its Draco attitude thrusters to re orient the vehicle after the trunk has separated. I think this is what we see ~@3:47 in that video where it looks like the gases from the attitude control system are visible being blown behind (?above) the spacecraft.


2

PICA is less dense than other materials and enables a lighter heatshield. Phenolic Impregnated Carbon Ablators (PICA) as Thermal Protection Systems for Discovery Missions Previous materials like fully-dense Carbon Phenolic (heritage entry grade Carbon Phenolic) used on more extreme missions like Pioneer Venus and the Galileo probe are propbably overkill ...


1

Each thruster will have a thrust vector. That can be resolved into torque and translation depending on the CM. If you have six thrusters you should be able to get all six degrees of freedom. If you want one pure degree of freedom you have to solve a set of simultaneous equations, which is not hard. If there is a degeneracy in the system you may not be ...


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