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1

Altho I'm a Mars Dust Devil researcher, my work is mostly conducted on terrestrial desert analogs (so I'd want to check my details if this were crucial... ). My understanding is that 1) the dust is re-cycled so much it's now very fine clay (2-4um), dry and often recently draped over surface roughness elements. Meanwhile, 2) weathered quartz leads to fine ...


2

As a Mars dust devil guy, I can say that the ubiquitous dust is NOT generally considered sharp-edged. Almost all of it is one of several clay minerals. Due to the absence of open water and given that the dust has been recycled continuously over many millennia (eroded, transported, deposited, re-eroded, etc), that dust is uniformly fine (2-4$\mu$m), "soft" (= ...


18

Escape from planetary atmospheres of the terrestrial planets in our solar system is dominated by ions in absolute numbers, as opposed to neutral particle species. Particles can be any type of molecule or atom here, mostly $\mathrm O^{+}$ and $\mathrm N^{+}$ for Earth. For the case of Earth, a particle, once ionised in the upper thermosphere, can couple to ...


7

Basically it is blown away by the solar wind, headed to interstellar space. A light particle in orbit around the Sun will tend to be pushed further out with time because of both solar wind and photonic pressure. Note there are a few pockets of dust around, but they are very hard to see. It takes being in a relatively stable point, usually the L4/ L5 points ...


10

A starting point for checking orbital stability is the Sphere of Influence for short term stability (or rather, to select a suitable frame a reference in the patched conic approximation), and the Hill sphere for more long term stability (satellites). $$r_{SOI} \approx a\left(\frac{m_{satellite}}{m_{parent}}\right)^{2/5}$$ For a reference spacecraft, I'm ...


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