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3

Ozone depletion first came up as a publicly visible issue around 1976. Up to that time, almost nobody was aware that ozone was an issue at all, so there hadn't been a big push to build satellites to observe it. Even when ozone depletion did become known, some greeted it with skepticism (especially people making money off of selling aerosols, of course). For ...


111

I believe the discovery was made by orbiting satellite, but I'm not sure which one. That is not the case. Look at the author affiliation for the article to which you linked. The three authors of that paper were from the British Antarctic Survey. These scientists were part of a larger expedition to Antarctica. They pointed a cheap instrument (extremely cheap ...


15

To quickly summarise the answer: Nimbus 7 was the satellite involved - but it wasn't first. The ozone hole did not substantially materialise before the early-1980s - in retrospect the decline was visible, as this graph shows, but the catastrophic drop hadn't happened yet. Nimbus 7 was the first satellite (I think?) to carry an ozone spectrophotometer, which ...


17

It was a secondary payload launched along with the first operational Transit navigation satellite (Transit 5BN-1) and was named, mundanely enough, Transit 5E-1. Mission goals were Measure omnidirectional flux of protons and electrons above certain threshold energies in order to determine the temporal variations in the radiation environment. Verify ...


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