20

The fastest way to leave the Solar System is to pass by as many of the Gas Giants as you can, and use their gravity to slingshot you faster. As there are no planets outside of the ecliptic, it would not be advantageous to avoid the ecliptic plane. This holds true until we start to get really fast space probes. Furthermore, passing by the planets would give ...


17

There are two major reasons you may be going outside the ecliptical plane: You want to get to a particular star. You want to put the Sun on a direct line between your craft and another point in the sky (usually a star system or an interstellar probe to that star system) to exploit Sun's gravitational lens (that is, your destination starts around 550-740 AU ...


4

This is an interesting question! tl;dr: I don't know about artificially maintained orbits, but for uncontrolled orbits Earth's strong oblateness and the Moon's gravitational perturbations will not allow for an orbit parallel to the ecliptic to remain that way. Near GEO: We're looking for an Earth orbit with an inclination of 23 degrees, and a ascending ...


3

If my understanding of the question is correct, the OP is asking why exactly the CSM/LM stack longitudinal axis (from nozzle bell to pointy front end) was oriented perpendicular to ecliptic plane during Passive Thermal Control (PTC) mode, when it would've been also possible to orient it within the ecliptic plane thus maintaining the line of sight with Earth ...


3

It depends on if you are doing a direct to leave the solar system or doing a flyby, but probably. If you are directly leaving the solar system, then the close you are to the Earth's inclination around the Sun, the more your velocity will count. If you go completely perpendicular to that, it will take quite a bit more fuel, as you have to do an inclination ...


2

The ecliptic plane of our solar system is at an angle of about 60º relative to the Galactic plane of our galaxy. The Milky Way is about 100,000 ly (30 kpc) in diameter, and, on average, approximately 1,000 ly (0.3 kpc) thick. This means that when you leave the solar system along our ecliptic plane, you can visit the stars in our neighborhood, but you '...


2

Google tries to use live images from the Slough Space Camera (and the Hubble as far as I know), so yes, I would assume that all of the geometrics are accurate or at least extremely close. You can actually use a feature called "sky" with Google Earth which enables you to: "Check out the new Slooh Space Camera layer to see live images of galaxies, objects ...


1

The four antenna dishes were mounted at the bottom side of the Service module. For continous communication during a PTC the central roll axis of the CSM should be oriented towards the ground stations on Earth. The nozzle of the SM engine and the bottom of the SM should not pass between antennas and ground station during PTC roll to ensure continous radio ...


1

You should be able to fetch ecliptic coordinates with: x, y, z = venus.at(t).ecliptic_position().km Here is the current documentation — it is a bit brief, so I will try adding an example to them this weekend. You will see that there is also a method, in case you ever need it, for ecliptic latitude and longitude: http://rhodesmill.org/skyfield/api-position....


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