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Building a space ship is rarely anything other than a capital joint venture, meaning it demands approval and agreement of many people from various different disciplines, having a wide range of authorities, responsibilities and things at stake. Starship is an exception in that most executive power lays with one single person. It is that key component, that ...


-1

The most important aspect of Starship is that it is (supposed to be) reusable. For most of rocket history it was almost impossible*. Why? Because of lack of good enough computers. You would need to put a pilot in it and the first few landings would end in RUD. The Space Shuttle got around this by landing as a plane. Only after someone demonstrated it's ...


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As other answers imply, the reason is likely not technical but economical. May be this question could attract some interesting answers at this sister site. I think it is a good example of an entrepreneur venturing into a field that has been always controlled by governments and exercising opportunities to "fail fast" and the availability of capital, ...


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Fundamentally, it's because of economics. There simply wasn't any demand for a large rocket between today and the space race. Let's analyze what (I think) makes the Starship concept special: Size: Starship is one of the biggest (if not the biggest) rockets ever constructed. Reusability: One of Starship's core design goals is to be reusable comparable to ...


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I wonder why nobody ever proposed a space launch system like Starship. What exactly do you mean by "like Starship"? Systems like Starship have been proposed before, although differing in the details, going back to Von Braun's mid-1950s Mars expedition concepts. Starship is ambitious in several ways, but it's more evolutionary than revolutionary. ...


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There's a more general class of offboard propulsion of which a "catcher" might be one type. You could call them "pushers", perhaps. I can see two different kinds of "pusher", each of which has its own specific problem, but both boil down to TANSTAAFL. One kind imparts momentum to the pushed object but also experiences recoil ...


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