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As this article says, the silicon carbide integrated circuits were demonstrated to work stably in the range of 1000 °C and for more than 100 hours under 800 °C temperature without changing the signal or supply voltage. While diffusion in the material happened and affected the characteristics of the device, it stabilized after this initial burn-in. The main ...


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Why do satellites have capacitance? Capacitance is some ratio of charge to potential difference, with a constant in front. Whenever some charge is added to something, be it a person, a cow, or a bit of metal in space, it's electrostatic potential changes. Capacitance is simply the ratio that tells us; *for a given charge added, how does much does the ...


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Interesting idea, and I don't see why it won't work. It'll probably even take less energy as you wouldn't need a heater filament. This also relates to something I've wondered recently about the use of SSTV to transmit images from the surface of Venus. SSTV, once demodulated is a relatively simple analog signal using three audible frequencies (representing ...


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Space in the vicinity of the Sun is not that cold, perhaps even out to Jupiter. One side of the spacecraft will be receiving sunlight while the side shielded from sunlight radiates into empty space. One simple solution to this is to put the vehicle into barbecue mode: The vehicle is made to slowly rotate, thereby preventing one side from getting too hot and ...


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The data needed to answer the question was collected by the Lunar Prospector Electron Reflectometer (ER). The data is then processed to derive the electrostatic potential, which is the same thing as the voltage. This article describes how the ER performs its measurements. http://www.tsgc.utexas.edu/spacecraft/lunar_prospector/er.html From the article: The ...


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A Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (sometimes referred to as a nuclear battery) is probably your best best: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radioisotope_thermoelectric_generator Although it gets warm it doesn't need to be "kept warm" as it heats itself from nuclear processes within the radioactive materials sealed inside it and it produces ...


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If a solar flare happened during a total lunar eclipse, would the Earth block the flare from hitting the moon? Probably not, for several reasons. The high frequency electromagnetic radiation from a solar flare isn't what does the bulk of the damage to power grids and such. It's the huge stream of charged particles released by coronal mass ejections (CMEs) ...


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