67

She is wearing an ELSA - Emergency Life Support Apparatus. It provides breathing air for a few minutes in case of emergencies, for example to escape a burning building. The clear plastic hood is used instead of a mouthpiece like divers use because it can be stored in a more compact way and it provides protection for the whole head against smoke and other ...


29

A nitrogen cold jet thruster system called SAFER (Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue) is part of the US EVA suit ensemble. If a crewperson gets loose they can fly back using SAFER. (Image source) SAFER is not used in the normal course of an EVA. There is no other propulsive system on a US EVA suit. SAFER was deemed necessary for the ISS era because either ...


27

Other suggestions here for trap mechanisms may have incorporated consideration of zero gravity on the operation of the trap, but not upon the mouse itself. In zero gravity, searching for a mouse is no longer an effectively 2-dimensional search of and behind surfaces. The moment a mouse escaped its enclosure and tried to walk along a surface, the very act of ...


23

This kind of situation, while not exactly frequent, has happened on ISS multiple times. With the large amount of debris out there, tracked objects do intersect the ISS orbit from time to time. There are procedures in place on precisely how this is handled. Generally speaking, this is how it works: ISS flight controllers get regular conjunction updates ...


19

There are many types of mousetraps, the traditional "snap trap" is unlikely to work well because it is dependent on pressure. Lethal traps like snap traps would be undesirable: Humane concerns Dead mice are a health concern in a closed environment You want the mice alive for experimentation So that leaves you with non-lethal traps, the two that come to ...


17

A solution that comes to mind is to seal off one section of the ISS at a time and depressurize it. Finding and removing dead mice may be somewhat easier than finding and removing live ones that are actively avoiding capture. (I fully agree with the comments - removing the dead mice would be a major problem)


13

Stargazer can definitely land with the rocket still attached. In fact Pegasus is usually loaded to Stargazer (with or without payload) at Vandenberg and then ferried to its actual launch site (CCAFS, Wallops, Kwaj, etc.) Stargazer is also able to abort a launch and return to the landing strip if there is anything wrong with the system. I believe this has ...


12

I believe that funnel traps should work in zero-gravity. They are not active, do not use gravity or springs. Gravity may help the mouse fall in for those with opening at the top but imho that is not strictly needed as other designs use openings on the sides. Image source Little Green Shop


12

Yes, I am a source for this information :) Here are some pictures I took of the escape system while standing on the launch pad tower during the STS-124 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The idea was that the crew would egress the Orbiter and run down a walkway to this platform. Then jump into the baskets, 2 people per basket. You can see the sign ...


9

Modern problems require modern solutions! You can't rely on gravity. what you want is a modified vacuum cleaner. Essentially a suction device with a metal grill to catch the mouse (nobody wants to puree a rodent!) Given that the mouse is essentially guiding itself along the wall, it doesn't have anything to cling to, and gravity is a non-factor. So the ...


9

This is not a full answer, but some numbers: What are the ISS moments of inertia around design axes? The total moment of inertia of the station is about $M = 55\cdot 10^6 \rm kg m^2$ How often must the ISS desaturate its control moment gyros? The reaction wheels are desaturated when they reach $13000 \rm ft lbf sec$ which is $L = 17 \rm kJs = 17 \rm kgm^2s^...


8

It was impossible to restart the engines in flight. If for no other reason, the pressure/temperature conditions for the "start box"1 were not met in flight. Also, Post Shutdown to Engine Ready was not a legal transition in the controller flight software. There were also considerations of engine drying (removal of residual water after shutdown), prelaunch ...


7

Please refer to this diagram while reading this answer. You mentioned modification of the first stage trajectory in response to initiation of an RTLS abort; this was in fact allowed for, within the stringent constraints of the first stage ascent. A pitch bias would be added to the pre-programmed pitch attitude to loft the trajectory above the nominal. You ...


7

I don't think it's happened in a long time, but in the early stages of assembly, the ISS sometimes flew in a "XPH" attitude when the beta angle* was between 10 and 75 degrees. The only public info I could find on this is from a rather annoying flash animation NASA page; it shows some animations of the orbits, here are two frames from the XPH example showing ...


6

Same as on Earth, just get a cat! I venture to speculate that the felonaut has the advantage in microgravity. Once a cat holds on to something with its claws, and while waiting there detects a mouse floating in open air without steering, it should be able to jump straight at it and catch it.


6

Deep space communications are intermittent: the communications link only exists when a dish antenna is aimed at the spacecraft. If a spacecraft has an emergency, nobody knows about it until the next scheduled DSN contact. DSN traffic is scheduled by the DSN organization. When a scheduled contact finds a problem, the schedule can be rearranged. I assume ...


6

The space segment of the Cospas-Sarsat system has two components, SAR signal repeaters (SARR) and SAR signal processors (SARP). The Sarsat instruments [...], receive these messages. They are downlinked to the distress terminals — known as Local User Terminals (LUT) — distributed around the globe. The message are then processed and distress alerts ...


6

The answer is given within the question, the emergency signals are received by the the International Cospas-Sarsat Programme satellites. From wikipedia: Space segment The Cospas-Sarsat system space segment consists of SARR and/or SARP instruments aboard: Five satellites in polar low-altitude Earth orbit called LEOSARs Seven satellites in ...


6

Yes, this is a photo of the MS-10 launch. This image also appears on Alexander's flickr page, with timestamp "October 11, 2018" and the title "Image of the Soyuz MS-10 launch as seen from the International Space Station".


4

So long as the object you wish to slow is made of metal you can slow it by putting a ring of magnets around it. How fast this will work depends on the metals involved. I do not believe this can bring it to an actual stop, however--the slower it turns the less braking force. Edit: Yes, you can stop it--if your ring is spinning the velocity won't go to ...


4

The sort of emergency that would require this power level is rare. You're looking at events where a remote (deep-space) spacecraft loses its orientation and can't use its high-gain antenna. I found one occasion where DSS-43 was used at 95 kW: during tests for communications with Rosetta just before it entered hibernation mode in 2010: During the ...


4

How might a mousetrap for use in space work? How might it differ from terrestrial 1 g mousetraps? Most of mouse traps don't rely on gravity. At least, the classic, spring-loaded, killing traps. They rely on a sensitive trigger on which the bait is fixed, and by twiddling with the bait, mouse sets the mechanism off. A problem could be in positioning the ...


3

The Lunar Module Ascent Engine. This document on page 66 states: 3-4. 4. ASCENT PROPULSION SECTION The ascent propulsion section consists of a constant-thrust , pressure-fed rocket engine , one fuel and one oxidizer tank , two helium tanks , and associated propellant feed and helium pressurization components. The engine develops 3, 500 pounds of ...


2

An alternative would be to enclose the object in an air tight container and pump some air inside. Drag would slow down the craft. The main issues for the aerodynamic drag technique will still be the same as for the magnetic drag technique: maintain separation between the container and the spinning object de-spin the container as the rotating air transfers ...


2

Organic Marble's answer to this QA describes the steps taken if a leak is suspected. Once it's definite that there's a leak, the outcome would depend largely on how large a hole is in the suit, but the procedure is likely the same: immediately cancel the EVA operation, have crew member "A" in the compromised suit head immediately for the nearest usable ...


2

The first four Space Shuttle missions had ejection seats, which is basically an intentional explosive decompression. The astronauts wore Launch Entry Suits designed to survive the decompression and ejection process. The current NASA suit is the Advanced Crew Escape Suit. Like the LES it derived from, it is designed for decompression and escape, although ...


1

Let's think this through. Some potential scenarios: The service module to rupture at the same time as the CM. It seems unlikely that anything that killed a service module could have been survivable from reentry that also caused a puncture, but... The worst case for this scenario is probably near that of Apollo 13, a few hours extra. Apollo 13 was about 87 ...


1

I'll "amalgamate" the comments below the question. The scenario is highly unlikely, but either through loss of pressure or contamination of the atmosphere, either ISS crew or an arriving crew could possibly need to be in the ISS while wearing a pressure or EVA suit. The OP asks if the laptops could be operated by someone wearing said suit, pointing out that ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible