67

She is wearing an ELSA - Emergency Life Support Apparatus. It provides breathing air for a few minutes in case of emergencies, for example to escape a burning building. The clear plastic hood is used instead of a mouthpiece like divers use because it can be stored in a more compact way and it provides protection for the whole head against smoke and other ...


53

A brand new rocket to be launched will have to be assembled, and that's a long process, though I do not know how long. But if it's for an emergency, you may find ready rockets. After the Columbia disaster, space shuttle missions all had a contingency mission in case they found issues with the orbiter before reentry. The planning and training processes for a ...


29

A nitrogen cold jet thruster system called SAFER (Simplified Aid For EVA Rescue) is part of the US EVA suit ensemble. If a crewperson gets loose they can fly back using SAFER. (Image source) SAFER is not used in the normal course of an EVA. There is no other propulsive system on a US EVA suit. SAFER was deemed necessary for the ISS era because either ...


28

Other suggestions here for trap mechanisms may have incorporated consideration of zero gravity on the operation of the trap, but not upon the mouse itself. In zero gravity, searching for a mouse is no longer an effectively 2-dimensional search of and behind surfaces. The moment a mouse escaped its enclosure and tried to walk along a surface, the very act of ...


24

This kind of situation, while not exactly frequent, has happened on ISS multiple times. With the large amount of debris out there, tracked objects do intersect the ISS orbit from time to time. There are procedures in place on precisely how this is handled. Generally speaking, this is how it works: ISS flight controllers get regular conjunction updates ...


19

There are many types of mousetraps, the traditional "snap trap" is unlikely to work well because it is dependent on pressure. Lethal traps like snap traps would be undesirable: Humane concerns Dead mice are a health concern in a closed environment You want the mice alive for experimentation So that leaves you with non-lethal traps, the two that come to ...


18

It was impossible to restart the engines in flight. If for no other reason, the pressure/temperature conditions for the "start box"1 were not met in flight. Also, Post Shutdown to Engine Ready was not a legal transition in the controller flight software. There were also considerations of engine drying (removal of residual water after shutdown), prelaunch ...


17

A solution that comes to mind is to seal off one section of the ISS at a time and depressurize it. Finding and removing dead mice may be somewhat easier than finding and removing live ones that are actively avoiding capture. (I fully agree with the comments - removing the dead mice would be a major problem)


13

Stargazer can definitely land with the rocket still attached. In fact Pegasus is usually loaded to Stargazer (with or without payload) at Vandenberg and then ferried to its actual launch site (CCAFS, Wallops, Kwaj, etc.) Stargazer is also able to abort a launch and return to the landing strip if there is anything wrong with the system. I believe this has ...


13

The ISS does not have emergency's that require a rocket to bring supplies. It can have an urgent need of something. Either everyone stays on the ISS or some/all crew leave. It is downhill all the way to Earth, and the crew can leave anytime. Worst case the crew abandons the ISS and it burns up on re-entry. There are a couple of good answers on this ...


13

Definitely. There's an article in Spektrum.de on it. It's in German, but it references some English-language articles. A referenced article (English) says that launches at the Guiana Space Center (that's the ESA spaceport near Kourou) are being suspended and satellites being put in safe standby mode (not many details). The Spektrum article references a NASA ...


12

I believe that funnel traps should work in zero-gravity. They are not active, do not use gravity or springs. Gravity may help the mouse fall in for those with opening at the top but imho that is not strictly needed as other designs use openings on the sides. Image source Little Green Shop


12

Yes, I am a source for this information :) Here are some pictures I took of the escape system while standing on the launch pad tower during the STS-124 Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test. The idea was that the crew would egress the Orbiter and run down a walkway to this platform. Then jump into the baskets, 2 people per basket. You can see the sign ...


12

A spacecraft fire is an extremely serious situation. Even if no serious damage is done to spacecraft systems, the cabin atmosphere is likely to be highly contaminated by toxic combustion products and possibly by whatever substance the extinguishers use. For shuttle, a serious cabin fire would result in a early deorbit case if the cabin atmosphere could not ...


11

This is not a full answer, but some numbers: What are the ISS moments of inertia around design axes? The total moment of inertia of the station is about $M = 55\cdot 10^6 \rm kg m^2$ How often must the ISS desaturate its control moment gyros? The reaction wheels are desaturated when they reach $13000 \rm ft lbf sec$ which is $L = 17 \rm kJs = 17 \rm kgm^2s^...


10

Please refer to this diagram while reading this answer. RTLS is not selected until after SRB sep: The earliest RTLS selection is made at 2m30s allowing time for SRB sep induced transients to be damped out, and for second stage guidance to converge. Therefore, an abort could be initiated before SRB sep, but the vehicle would not begin the RTLS ...


10

WRONG. Grumman had already planned for that scenario nearly four years prior to the accident. The Grumman-directed Apollo Mission Planning Task Force reported on studies of abort sequences for translunar coast situations and the LEM capability to support an abort if the SM had to be jettisoned. The LEM could be powered down in drifting flight except for ...


9

Modern problems require modern solutions! You can't rely on gravity. what you want is a modified vacuum cleaner. Essentially a suction device with a metal grill to catch the mouse (nobody wants to puree a rodent!) Given that the mouse is essentially guiding itself along the wall, it doesn't have anything to cling to, and gravity is a non-factor. So the ...


9

It depends on readiness of a rocket. Rocket assembly is rather long process. If you compare the dates of rocket delivery to launch facility and the launch you'll find that usually it takes about month or more. So if some rocket is ready to launch to ISS in coming days it's rather easy - just throw out some of less significant things and replace it by the ...


7

I don't think it's happened in a long time, but in the early stages of assembly, the ISS sometimes flew in a "XPH" attitude when the beta angle* was between 10 and 75 degrees. The only public info I could find on this is from a rather annoying flash animation NASA page; it shows some animations of the orbits, here are two frames from the XPH example showing ...


7

The escape pole / hatch jettison system was only certified to work in a controlled gliding flight situation. See Mode VIII Egress in the Crew Escape Workbook That doesn't mean that the crew couldn't try to save themselves though. There was a Loss of Control / Break-up procedure in the Ascent Checklist. My feasibility estimate: slim.


7

Referencing the Ascent Checklist Ascent Cue Card: There were no procedures for failed SRB separation, and nothing the crew or ground could do about it. 1 The ET separation sequence2 could be halted by either excessive vehicle rotation rates, or by failure of the shutoff valves in the main propulsion system feedlines to close (or indicate closed). The crew ...


6

Deep space communications are intermittent: the communications link only exists when a dish antenna is aimed at the spacecraft. If a spacecraft has an emergency, nobody knows about it until the next scheduled DSN contact. DSN traffic is scheduled by the DSN organization. When a scheduled contact finds a problem, the schedule can be rearranged. I assume ...


6

The space segment of the Cospas-Sarsat system has two components, SAR signal repeaters (SARR) and SAR signal processors (SARP). The Sarsat instruments [...], receive these messages. They are downlinked to the distress terminals — known as Local User Terminals (LUT) — distributed around the globe. The message are then processed and distress alerts ...


6

The answer is given within the question, the emergency signals are received by the the International Cospas-Sarsat Programme satellites. From wikipedia: Space segment The Cospas-Sarsat system space segment consists of SARR and/or SARP instruments aboard: Five satellites in polar low-altitude Earth orbit called LEOSARs Seven satellites in ...


6

Yes, this is a photo of the MS-10 launch. This image also appears on Alexander's flickr page, with timestamp "October 11, 2018" and the title "Image of the Soyuz MS-10 launch as seen from the International Space Station".


6

Same as on Earth, just get a cat! I venture to speculate that the felonaut has the advantage in microgravity. Once a cat holds on to something with its claws, and while waiting there detects a mouse floating in open air without steering, it should be able to jump straight at it and catch it.


6

The major difference between the response to a cabin leak in the shuttle and station is that, if the leak cannot be stopped, the shuttle would terminate its mission and enter, and the station (or parts of it) would be abandoned. Some information about leak isolation procedures on the station can be found in the answers to Can they isolate individual modules ...


6

NASA has priority over almost any customer from SpaceX, so if a Dragon capsule was available, it could be done on short notice. Assuming that it would be something that fits in to a dragon capsule, it could potentially be done in a matter of a few weeks. If the hardware isn't available, it would be a few months. But realistically, this isn't very likely to ...


6

Let the bad times roll! :-( NPR reports that the Russian-European ExoMars mission to Mars has been delayed. While factors other than COVID-19 figured into this decision, there was also this consideration: "We have made a difficult but well-weighed decision to postpone the launch to 2022," Roscosmos Director General Dmitry Rogozin said in a ...


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