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12 votes
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Choosing a specific region to live on Mars, how important will the degree of dust there be, compared with the availability of water?

Water is extremely useful on Mars. You can use it to generate oxygen directly via electrolysis and the hydrogen byproduct can be reacted with carbon dioxide to make even more water. We drink water. ...
user2702772's user avatar
  • 1,074
10 votes

Can fish really live in microgravity without water?

Gills aren't purely for respiration. Fish constantly excrete ammonia and urea from their gills and without sufficient water to wash the waste away this would soon cause death, much like how too small ...
Glenn's user avatar
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7 votes
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What kind of lighting does the ISS use?

Feng Shui is not used. The ISS is a science lab and Feng Shui is not scientific. Currently, fluorescent lighting is used. A study is underway to replace this with LED lighting. The Testing Solid ...
Hobbes's user avatar
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7 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

Since Steve just contributed an answer to this...well, so will I. There's no need to consume and eject mass for heat control. Mars is cold. See, for example, this Science article. Although wind ...
Erin Anne's user avatar
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7 votes
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When was an operational satellite accidentally damaged by another man-made object in space?

I think that there must be many such collisions that occurred without even the satellite operators noticing, and certainly not reporting them. There were also intentional collisions with anti-...
BowlOfRed's user avatar
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7 votes
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How cryogenic oxygen was heated up for CM cabin repressurization?

Unsurprisingly, it worked exactly like it did in shuttle. To assure uniform flow, the capillary restrictors are coiled around a warm water-glycol line to increase the oxygen temperature. Page 2....
Organic Marble's user avatar
6 votes
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How to make a camera survive in (near) space?

I've used a stock GoPro on a high altitude balloon that made it to 40 km, it recorded the whole way up and down (on external power). So depending on your mass and financial budget you could use this ...
PeteBlackerThe3rd's user avatar
6 votes

Why is there no concerted effort to collect solar energy on a global scale?

The scale needed to address human energy requirements in the near future and the scale of things like Dyson spheres are completely different. Human energy usage at present is about 18TW Assuming 20% ...
Steve Linton's user avatar
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6 votes
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What happens in to the fuel in fuel-rich Lox-Kerosene?

TLDR: The combination burning of hot kerosene and sun-driven decomposition of any remainder gets rid of it quite quickly. From an environmental point of view, this is the bottom line: It is ...
Bob Jacobsen's user avatar
  • 12.7k
6 votes

Temperatures in "near" space compared to LEO

A vacuum is a pretty good insulator, much better than the air at the altitudes balloons operate at.
Hobbes's user avatar
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5 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

As far as I know, no Mars suit has been finalized yet. The Apollo A7L suit is really heavy (91 kg), which was acceptable in the Moon's lower gravity. On Mars it'd get uncomfortable pretty soon, so I ...
Hobbes's user avatar
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5 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

Well, of course we don't know what our engineers will choose but: Mars has an atmosphere so traditional earth cooling/heating is possible. Think about a fancy heatsink running in your MarsSuit.
Antzi's user avatar
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5 votes
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Determine envelopes for the payloads?

For STS payload induced enviroments, grab yourself a copy of the Space Shuttle User's Handbook and you will find plenty of data starting on page 31 of the pdf. Vibration, noise, thermal, pressure (...
Organic Marble's user avatar
4 votes

What kinds of activities experiment and procedures done on the ISS must be done in nominal-pressure chambers that need to be vented to space?

The Vacuum System on the International Space Station is composed of two separate parts: the VRS (Vacuum Resource System) and the VES (Vacuum Exhaust System). The VRS is for maintaining a vacuum ...
Doresoom's user avatar
  • 1,754
3 votes

How bright would Earthlight be from the surface of the Moon? Can you read under the light of the Earth?

The OP links to the Forbes Mar 18, 2017 article Ask Ethan: How Bright Is The Earth As Seen From The Moon? and @PM2Ring comments FWIW, Dr Ethan Siegel is a qualified astrophysicist and an excellent ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
3 votes

Temperatures in "near" space compared to LEO

Heat transfers in one of three ways: convection, conduction, and/or radiation. In the vacuum of space, radiation is the primary mechanism of heat leaving a spacecraft. Radiation is slow acting and ...
Justin Braun's user avatar
  • 2,285
3 votes

Does a LEO mission to study the marine debris exist or is at least planned?

It seems the European Space Agency is planning to do it, see this recent article (19 March 2018): https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Preparing_for_the_Future/Discovery/...
BlueCoder's user avatar
  • 2,113
3 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

It seems plausible to me that a CO2 sublimation system is an option. Perhaps instead of water, a pressurized tank of liquid CO2 is expended. The advantage would be that a station based compressor ...
Ken's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

Let's take @Uwe's number of 500W from body heat and the functioning of the suit. This needs to be removed from the suit one way or another. Passive conduction isn't really an option on Mars, the air ...
Steve Linton's user avatar
  • 19.6k
3 votes

Is water on Mars the same as Earth water?

This discussion on quora talks about deuterium abundance on Mars: Deuterium occurs naturally on Earth in water as 1 in 6,400 hydrogen atoms or 1 part in 3,200 by weight. On Mars it is one deuterium ...
Steve Linton's user avatar
  • 19.6k
2 votes

How big of a problem is the Lunar eclipse in April 2014 for LADEE?

How big of a problem is the Lunar eclipse in April 2014 for LADEE? 8.5 years later, we know the answer. From Wikipedia's LADEE; End of mission: The probe then dealt with the April 2014 lunar eclipse ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes

Vehicle liquids freeze on the Moon -- how has this problem been solved?

Supplementary answer: Vehicle liquids freeze on the Moon -- how has this problem been solved? There's an example where liquid/solid transitions really are a feature, not a bug. How much wax is on ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes

Why are the EVA suits in the suitport (concept) exposed to the environment?

The "Suitport" images you have seen are conceptual. They serve to illustrate the concept and capture people's imaginations, and showing any additional structure would be counter to that purpose. If we ...
Kengineer's user avatar
  • 1,748
2 votes

Will suits worn on Mars lose kilograms of "expendable water" each time they are used?

UPDATE: "Ice batteries" are already starting to be commercialized, currently as larger scale devices for homes or buildings. With experienced gained here, a miniatureized version may be ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
2 votes
Accepted

What kinds of activities experiment and procedures done on the ISS must be done in nominal-pressure chambers that need to be vented to space?

Note: This is an answer was originally written to answer an earlier version of the question: "What kinds of activities, experiments, and procedures done on the ISS must be done in a vacuum or ...
phil1008's user avatar
  • 6,148
2 votes

What would it take to collect methane from the atmosphere and use it as rocket fuel?

Energy. Air liquefaction requires a lot of energy. As noted in the comment by @CallMeTom to collect enough methane you have to liquefy huge amounts of air just to get some methane. However air ...
FluidCode's user avatar
  • 191
2 votes

What would it take to collect methane from the atmosphere and use it as rocket fuel?

Filtering low concentration things out of any solvent is always very difficult: you need to find something that binds to the target, but only the target. Meanwhile there are huge amounts of methane ...
pjc50's user avatar
  • 605
1 vote

When was an operational satellite accidentally damaged by another man-made object in space?

This answer is now obsolete as question has been clarified. First collision between an operational satellite and "another object in space"? all of them, most likely! For starters, in the ...
CuteKItty_pleaseStopBArking's user avatar
1 vote

How to make a camera survive in (near) space?

Here's a few GoPro Hero 4 Blacks powered by Brunton All Day 2.0 battery packs according to The Record Player Built for Space; How an independent record label launched the first vinyl into the ...
uhoh's user avatar
  • 149k
1 vote

What happens in to the fuel in fuel-rich Lox-Kerosene?

This issue deserves a lot more attention than it currently gets. According to research, microscopic soot particles develop that could persist in the atmosphere for a long time. This is essentially ...
Everyday Astronaut's user avatar

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