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53

At least in the Shuttle program, I'm afraid the list of forbidden foods was almost infinitely long. Anything not officially tested and approved was forbidden. From the Space Shuttle Food System Summary (only covers the first 25 flights) here's the menu you got to choose from. Don't worry, it's only a couple of weeks at most. From eating this stuff in ...


38

There are in fact many foods astronauts are not allowed to eat. I'll be specifically talking about the ISS as they are the only ones currently in space. Bread: Astronauts are not allowed to eat bread because their crumbs can go into machine and equipment, and into astronauts' eyes. Alcohol: Russians were allowed to drink small quantities of alcohol (such ...


14

EDIT: How about some photographic evidence? This is Pete Conrad, during suit-up for Apollo 12, having a sandwich stashed. From this Popular Science article it appears the whole Apollo 12 crew got sandwiches: After breakfast, the crew went to don their pressure suits. ... At one point, the technician assisting Conrad slipped a sandwich into his leg pocket,...


14

In addition to the vegetarian and even vegan astronauts mentioned elsewhere, there soon may be more. In at least one of many possible scenarios for food on long flights, NASA astronauts on the proposed Mars mission for 2030 will be on vegan diets. The need for sustainable food options and preservability of the food is driving this choice.


12

The water temperature for restoring products, making tea and coffee is different: + 85˚ С or from + 25˚ С to + 42˚ С - depending on what the cosmonaut has on the menu. Hot water is used mainly for the preparation of drinks, first and second courses, warm - for salads and snacks. To have lunch, the cosmonaut cuts the packet along the colored line, gently ...


10

Fuel requirements will probably dominate food and other consumables by an order of magnitude or more, so you can't save mass by shortening the trip. The exact tradeoff depends on the assumptions you make. I'm just going to consider the outbound leg of the flight. NASA's trajectory browser offers me two missions to Mars in the 2025-2035 timeframe: ...


9

The potassium deficiency issues on the Apollo missions were at least to some degree due to exertion during the lunar EVAs. Despite the low gravity, the stiffness of pressurized spacesuits made what would otherwise be moderate activity more strenuous; the astronauts sweated off several pounds each according to Biomedical Results of Apollo: All Apollo ...


8

Yes; NASA selected bok choy, aka "Chinese cabbage", for one of their recent garden experiments, quite possibly because of its high vitamin c content (45mg, half of your daily recommended dose, per 100g). The mission launched in 2014, and as far as I'm aware was a success but I haven't tracked down the specific paper recounting the experiment, if anyone's ...


8

As astronaut is always to choose the food of his/her own choice . They have a tasting period of 15 days to eat and choose what foods he/she likes to eat in space and the food choice has to meet the standard for rocket travel though. Of course there will be moderation by nutrition experts to ensure the astronaut is getting the recommended diet value of car/...


7

Perchlorate contamination is a problem on Earth. Essentially, there is a series of water treatments and bioremediation, the process of using biological systems to fix the problem. Here is a detailed summary of one effective approach. The short answer is this: Engineers know how to do this on Earth, and the Martian solution is likely to be an adaptation of ...


6

Yes, it wasn't uncommon. Types of food used on the first 25 Space Shuttle missions included thermostabilized food in flex pouches or cans, rehydratable foods and beverages in square packages, and IM and NF foods in transparent plastic pouches. (emphasis mine) IM = Intermediate Moisture NF = Natural Form Apologies for picture quality. The can ...


6

Growing potatoes and other food on Mars is not just a sci-fi curiosity. Now, a NASA-backed "Potatoes on Mars" experiment is showing that Watney's fictional feat might actually be possible. To that end, scientists at NASA and the International Potato Centre (CIP) in Lima, Peru, built a tuber-growing experiment that recreates the extreme conditions on the ...


5

Per a face-to-face conversation last week with a former NASA astronaut who's been in these EMU several times while in Earth orbit, he said that they no longer have food available in the EMU suits. It ended up being too messy and not worth the hassle. They still have water available, but no longer food.


4

There's an interesting article on phys.org, today, about the BIOMEX experiment on the ISS. The tests involved samples of different organisms such as bacteria, algae, lichens and fungi being exposed to vacuum, intense ultraviolet radiation and extreme temperature variations on the exterior of the ISS for a total of 533 days. Astrobiologist Jean-...


4

There are six types of water on the ISS (nothing on the ISS is simple!) Note that the potable water has minerals added "for taste". The shuttle water system added iodine to its potable water by running fuel cell product water through a microbial filter. Minerals were not added to the shuttle potable water. The US iodinated water and the Russian silver-...


3

Roscosmos news page from 2009 quotes Alexander Agureev (Александр Агуреев), the head of food/nutrition department of Institute of Biomedical Problems RAS (IBMP) . According to his words, unlike on ISS at the time (2009), in the earlier days on "Mir" space station alcohol tincture was served, apparently, for medical purposes: “No alcohol-containing ...


2

In theory cosmic rays are more than capable of producing harmful by-products after colliding with food. They are high energy and on impact can cause all sorts of exotic (and unhealthy) of of matter. These are called "cosmogenic nuclides" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cosmogenic_nuclide and include some pretty nasty things. However its worth noting cosmic ...


2

Summary: There were at least 9 years and 6 months of continuous plant growth on the ISS, so the answer is yes if you accept a +/- 6 month margin of error. The first plant growth experiment hosted on the ISS was ADVASC, or Advanced Astroculture, which boarded the station on April 21, 2001 during Expedition 2. No later than May 6, 2001, the growth was started ...


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