5

Combustion requires a fuel (hydrogen), an ignition source (your enormous explosive), and an oxidizer. There's a very small amount of oxygen in the atmospheres of the gas giants, almost all of it already bound up in water -- i.e. all the oxygen has already combusted with some of the hydrogen. Without the introduction of a lot more oxygen or other oxidizer, ...


4

I'll make a simplifying assumptions that the giant planets are very close to spherical and that the density inside these planets depends only on radial distance from the center of the planet. (This is not quite correct as the giant planets rotate rather quickly, making the planets oblate spheroids rather than spheres. But the differences are small.) These ...


4

That's a tricky question, if you want to go into enough detail. Generally, the gas giants consist mostly of gas, and you can derive the density and thus gravity if you know the equation of state of the gas (that's the tricky bit). A random treatise on the exploration of Saturn's internal structure based on gravity data could be this article as found in ArXiv....


1

I know I shouldn't answer such an unrealistic hypothetical question but here goes... What would happen if Jupiter became solid like Earth and condensed to the size of Earth? Well at these densities the transition from gas at the edge to whatever you'd call it at the center of Jupiter is a bit complicated, there aren't distinct gas/liquid and liquid/solid ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible