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27

We turn to Mars, which we have studied for decades now. And we do see plenty of mineral diversity on the surface of the Red Planet, it's not just rust by any means. Curiosity's CheMin analyzer has studied the surface mineral composition of the Gale Crater. Quoting from this answer: This diagram provided by Curiosity's CheMin analyzer (source) shows that ...


17

They do not! The reasons for this are simple: minerals are semi-stable configurations of elements formed in certain pressure-temperature-chemical conditions. A planet in the possession of active plate tectonics will also be in the possession of more extreme pressures and temperatures (not to mention introduces chemicals to such conditions that would not ...


4

We have a little bit of information about the Earth Moon and the planet Mars and very little bit about Venus, but nothing like the wealth of information about the Earth's minerals, more than 5000 known minerals. There may be unknown minerals very deep in the oceans or deeper than the deepest bore holes. We may suspect the gas giants Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune ...


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