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Consider the middling-future, when humans have put probes around other stars and other planets. We have run out of old Gods to mash into names like areostationary. In this case, "geostationary" or "stationary" or one of the other generic naming conventions appearing in other Answers is appropriate.


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I'll go with Emily Lakdawalla who in her blog post about stationkeeping in Mars orbit wrote (emphasis mine), What is a geostationary orbit like at Mars? I have to pause here for a brief discussion of semantics. The authors of this paper discuss "areostationary" for Mars orbits as opposed to "geostationary" for Earth, and Wikipedia uses the same convention,...


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Geostationary orbits are synchronous orbits, which are also circular and equatorial. You could describe orbits around other planets in the same way, as circular, equatorial & synchronous orbits. For Mars, the terms areostationary and areosynchronous are (sometimes) used. This follows the convention of how apsides are named, so it is likely that the ...


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Perhaps "Clarke orbit"? The definitions always talk about Earth but at least it's not in the term. https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Clarke_orbit


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"Yes", sort of, there have been some missions proposed and yes, as you mention, they mainly use solar sails. Actual mission proposals have focused on what reasonable, state-of-the-art solar sails could really do. This limits them to working in places where other orbital forces are easier to counteract. Probably the one that is furthest along (although, ...


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This is not a complete answer as I won't be including the exact calculation needed to find out your burn time, but at least I will address the direct return vs bi elliptic approach. For a return from orbit of a manned spacecraft, you want to balance two factors: On one side you want to minimise the amount of fuel required for the operation; on the other, ...


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It doesn't matter when, as the system is rotationally symmetric. A retrograde burn is almost certainly the most efficient method (excluding any very long time period wait-for-perturbations-to-become-significant ones). It is uncommon to de-orbit geostationary object so you might not find much about it directly (the common approach is to increase the orbital ...


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