12

Because, first, we will never fix everything. Humans are always naturally dissatisfied with their state of affairs, no matter what those are. Reference "first world problems" (see image). Compared to how things were hundreds of years ago, we have already solved all of the problems of that time and are now at what would have been to them an unimaginable ...


8

The satellites were launched on a vehicle operated by the indian government, with (at least implicit) permission of India. This is clearly not a violation of the Outer Space Treaty, it only means that India is now ultimately liable for damages caused by these satellites. If India didn't want to assume liability itself, it should have required the satellite ...


7

Sorry for being a few weeks late to this, but hopefully I can shed some light on how to think about it. The ISRO launch of these satellites is legally problematic in several ways. First, and as already mentioned in the question itself as well as another answer, one key issue here is Article VI of the Outer Space Treaty. For purposes of this launch, a key ...


6

During a congressional debate regarding Fermilab's very first particle accelerator, Senator Pastore put the following question to the physicist Robert R. Wilson, Is there anything here that projects us in a position of being competitive with the Russians, with regard to this race? To which Dr Wilson responded, Only from a long-range point of view, ...


6

No. There are at least 2 government agencies that must approve of a launch under normal circumstances, the FCC and the FAA. Per FCC guidelines Satellites authorized by an administration other than the United States do not require any FCC approval if earth station operations are exclusively outside the United States. The FAA requirements are as ...


5

Not the end of the world this time! This appears to be one of a pair of Ullage Motors (#36406 and #36407) from the Block DM upper stage of a Proton-M launch vehicle. The Kosmos 2459, 2460, 2461 missions launched March 2010 and have/had several related pieces of debris that were expected to reenter. This kind of occurrence is very commonplace - many ...


5

Space has always been important for improving life conditions on Earth. The astronomical invention "the calendar" was not only necessary for agriculture, but even before that for migrating hunters and gatherers to time the seasons of suitable activities. Space has also always been necessary for navigation, since tens of thousands of years. And possibly even ...


4

This infographic should be a good representative of how many launches can be considered classified, so I'm reposting it here from the Collection of space exploration related infographics thread on our Space Exploration meta: T. McCall, M. Orcutt: Space over Time / History of Space Launches Infographic date: August 23, 2011     ...


3

A Directorate is a high level branch that reports to an associate admin who reports to the administrator. Here's a NASA org chart showing the Directorates at center If it had happened, there would have been an additional red box there in the center. Presumably, Mr. Sirangelo was intended to head up the new Directorate: Subsequent to our completing two ...


3

From the Wikipedia list, the most recently launched nuclear reactor appears to be a TOPAZ-I on Kosmos 1867, launched by the USSR in 1987. It's parked in a 800km orbit at 65º inclination and appears to be falling apart. For Earth orbit applications, solar power mass efficiency (~100 W/kg) is much better than RTG (~2.8 W/kg) or reactors like TOPAZ-I (~15 W/...


3

The government shut down did not stop SpaceX from launching an iridium satalite. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/spacex-launches-falcon9-rocket-iridium-next-satellites-live-stream-today-2019-01-11/ SpaceX has many existing launch licenses. See Faa.gov below. https://www.faa.gov/data_research/commercial_space_data/licenses/


3

Violation of trade restrictions In addition to @PearsonArtPhoto ‘s answer of the FAA and FCC regulations, launching from another facility would violate the International Traffic in Arms Regulations and Export Administration Regulations ( ITAR and EAR). From the ITAR wiki page: For practical purposes, ITAR regulations dictate that information and ...


3

I think the answer to this is basically no or at least not any harder than other 1U CubeSats. I base this answer on two lines of argument. Also your data above more or less proves what I am about to say. First, this quote from Swarm co-founder Sara Spangelo "All seven SpaceBEE satellites launched to date have been consistently tracked by both the Space ...


2

I don't have a great answer to this, because each mission is rather unique, and the response always seems to be "it depends". You'll likely need to get a frequency allocation from the FCC for your radio transmissions. Now I know there may be ways to get around this if you're low enough power or have a relatively common bandwidth/frequency, regardless it's ...


2

NASA's Intellectual Property policy contains a lot of information. If I'm reading the legalese correctly, it states that NASA can file for patents, and will license those technologies if appropriate. See this site for a list of patents that NASA is willing to license, for instance. This site also lists examples of some patents that NASA will give for free, ...


2

Perhaps this professor (correctly) sees the majority of space exploration being performed by nation-states and therefore via taxation. He also probably (incorrectly) sees the majority of the other things he mentions also being the responsibility of and performed by governments. Finally, he also probably sees the world as a fixed sum -- meaning if we spend ...


2

There is already a UK Space Agency which has a strategy called LaunchUK that is pushing for investment in a number of launch sites in the UK. I guess the Scottish Government may want to create their own agency at some point and have the responsibilites for any launch sites devolved to Holyrood. There doesn't seem to be any appetite for that at the moment ...


2

I don't believe so. If you want to find useful metals or water, you'd use either a satellite in orbit, or you'd go to the lunar surface directly and start prospecting. Given the rarity of SLS launches through the 2020s and likely through the 2030s as well, the Gateway would do little to improve our knowledge of the lunar environment. As best as I can tell, ...


2

Today I just received a first announcement from JPL's Jon Giorgini. It announces the first of the "Major changes... coming in the near future, including possible hostname and/or URL changes." At least the first of which I'm aware. The message begins: The JPL Solar System Dynamics group's "ssd.jpl.nasa.gov" server, including the Horizons ephemeris ...


2

tl;dr: Except for the 1939 lunar lander, it seems the projects undertaken during the "JPL's Army years" were related to weaponry (WW2 and after) rather than space exploration. So while the name "Jet Propulsion Laboratory" remained the same, the actual entity we associate with space exploration was not really the one founded by said individuals. The linked ...


2

A launch pad with a launch tower suitable for that specific rocket would be neccessary. Also a launch control center with all those computers and terminals. Antennas and receivers for the telemetry of the rocket. A lot of connections fitting to the rocket for tanking of fluids and gases. Many electrical connections for ground power and sensors needed for ...


1

Wikipedia: JPL traces its beginnings to 1936 in the Guggenheim Aeronautical Laboratory at the California Institute of Technology (GALCIT) when the first set of rocket experiments were carried out in the Arroyo Seco. Caltech graduate students Frank Malina, Qian Xuesen, Weld Arnold, and Apollo M. O. Smith, along with Jack Parsons and Edward S. Forman, ...


1

SSB is run by JPL, which although they do a lot of NASA work, and are a NASA operations center, is actually run by the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and thus are not actually government employees. At the very least, I can tell you that they have actually responded to an email I sent them earlier this week. Of course, they will not be getting ...


1

@SpaceLawyer's answer is accepted but recent news about a nearly one million dollar fine paid to the FCC helps clarify the fact that they flew without permission from the US government further clarifies that the US government hadn't authorized the bees. Since ISRO didn't take responsibility for the bees either, these are unauthorized bees! TechCrunch's FCC ...


1

I am a bit cynical on the topic of ULA. They have been running what I consider a scam for a long time, and because there was no competition, we saw what happens in a monopoly situation. ULA has used the claim of reliability and payload size in the past. They have not had a failure of a payload in over a decade and over a hundred launches. Thus for unique ...


1

As difficult to answer as this question is (how can one know that a government hasn't and just not publicised it well?) here's a good first step in looking for the answer. http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=link%3Awww.mars-one.com+inurl%3A.gov&oq=link%3Awww.mars-one.com+inurl%3A.gov That google search looks for any webpage that has .gov in it's url that ...


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