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4

Starship's limited $\Delta V$ means that it can't stray too far from minimum energy transfers. 100t payload + 120t dry mass + 1200t of propellant + 380s $I_{sp}$ $\to$ ~$6900m/s$, turns out this wasn't a meme Here is a porkchop plot of the next decades' worth of Mars to Earth trajectories subject to $\Delta V < 6.9$ $km/s$ (ignoring fuel for landing) ...


4

Using a selection from Wikipedia's List of natural satellites (moons with listed masses) I, with some simplifying assumptions, calculated both the deflection, $\delta$, and $\Delta V$ for each moon. In all cases the moons were assumed to be in a circular orbit around the parent planet. To find the $V_{\infty}$ for the encounter, I calculated the orbital ...


7

Yes, but really no. Preamble: I built a little 2D trajectory simulation (2D because the Galilean moons are more or less coplanar) to test out trajectories (Jupiter + Galilean moons gravity, RK4, 10s time step). My original intention was to perform an exhaustive search across 4 dimensions of initial conditions but this was prohibitively expensive (...


2

Edit: re-reading the question this is not an answer, which is looking for solutions involving gravity assists only while this only covers aerobraking orbit adjustment The study here (summary is section 6.4) found that for an example mission profile while substantial mass/cost savings would be possible it would involve several years of orbital shaping to ...


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