Hot answers tagged

29

The presence of gravity simplifies a number of common processes. Some examples: Separating liquids from gasses, eg. getting the water out of the air after you take a shower, or removing the hydrogen bubbles from water produced in a fuel cell. Cooling hot objects: you can use radiator fins and convective airflow rather than needing to stick cooling fans or ...


23

It would help you to learn which plants can grow properly in a greenhouse on the moon or Mars. When a seed germinates, the root starts growing downward with gravity, and the shoot grows upward to the surface of the soil. Light also helps to orient the plant, but it only works once the shoot has breached the surface of the soil. The angle of sunlight is ...


20

Nice observation, he is just doing it to show off! Check these out: https://twitter.com/cmdr_hadfield/status/326727757109268481?lang=en


11

Having a facility to investigate the effect of variable gravity levels would be very interesting from a scientific perspective. Some of the questions that might be worth finding the answers to are: How do various plants and bacteria respond to different gravity fields? How does this effect how they grow and the crop yields for plants? How does Lunar or ...


10

Partial answer (written prior to major edit of question): Not sure about "going blind" but eye damage can occur in as little as 10 seconds. Nor do I know how long it takes to recover from "going blind". Most spacecraft windows and spacesuit helmet visors have coatings to prevent transmission of UV. This label refers to the one on the ...


8

It does seem that Lebedev and his crewmate Anatoliy Berezovoy did indeed suntan on Salyut-7. The NASA report references a column in 'Pravda', which published excerpts from the published diary of Lebedev, "Моё измерение: дневник космонавта", or "My dimension: a cosmonaut's diary". While it is hard to find the newspaper, the book can be ...


5

Not only were they starved, they were starved for a lot longer than the 6-day duration of the mission. According to this translation of Gaidamakin et al. (1969), the "turtles" (steppe tortoises, Testudo horsfieldi Gray) were actually starved for 39 days: The turtles were put on board the "Zond-5" on 2 September 1968. From that time on ...


4

Note: Engineering Judgement Applied when figuring what active proposal means No, there are no active proposals for a future crewed space station to use artificial gravity. The only planned space station which has a realistic chance of being built close to its announced schedule is the 'Chinese large modular space station' It is a free-fall design. You can ...


4

I'd assume you could essentially use it as a very large reaction wheel, so use it for station keeping/ fine control of attitude


3

This article from Air Space Mag (https://www.airspacemag.com/space/window-on-the-world-1142261/) says that the window for the Destiny module was designed as such (emphasis my own) The window’s glass is a special stock of high-purity, colorless, synthetic fused silicon dioxide—a material chosen for its resistance to the effects of thermal variations and its ...


3

Pretty much as my answer to a related question: As part of the experiment, the crew of the ISS are subjected to the Dynamic Lighting Schedule: Have the astronauts settled on a white or near-white setting ? Yes: Pre-programmed and pre-planned with 3 lighting values: Three pre-determined light settings are envisaged for use in different operational ...


3

You have several kinds of radiation to deal with: Sunlight. Sunlight has a fair amount of UV. On Earth most of this is blocked by the ozone layer. Only a fairly small percentage gets through. Hence all the fuss and feathers about chloro-fluoro carbons (freon and friends) breaking down the ozone layer. On Mars you don't have enough free oxygen to form ...


2

Wow, there's a lot of woo in that press release. NASA has had an interest in growing plants in space for a long time. Some plants give off ethylene gas, though, and there was a desire to remove this from the cabin atmosphere. Accordingly NASA developed (or paid for the development of) devices to remove ethylene. The technology referenced in the press release ...


2

Roskosmos has plans to build a Mir-type orbital station (without artificial gravity) using new ISS modules. Roskosmos after 50 years of work with orbital stations in Earth orbit plans to build a small lunar orbital station. All interests of Roscosmos on the Moon:


2

Special requirements in open space are imposed on the transparent part of the suit: protection of eyes and face from active ultraviolet rays, infrared (thermal) rays, should weaken solar radiation in the visible part of the spectrum, while ensuring good visibility at this illumination. В открытом космосе, за пределами атмосферы, состав солнечного излучения ...


2

While @DrSheldon's answer points out that a reduced gravity simulator... ...would help you to learn which plants can grow properly in a greenhouse on the moon or Mars. A access to a long-term reduced artificial gravity field will also yield information on how people might fare on Mars. There is a lot of data on rates of bone loss and deterioration of eyes ...


1

The biggest windows I can think of that can expose crew to a good dose of sunlight are the ISS' cupola, so those might be a good starting point. Like all the other US spacecraft windows I know of (except for the shuttle side hatch window) the cupola windows have coatings to keep out the UV. On each pane there is a coating to prevent reflection when the ...


1

Not modern, but Apollo used coatings on the windows of the command module and lunar module. Source: Apollo Experience Report: Spacecraft Structural Windows, NASA Tech Note D-7439. The CM windows were triple-pane (except for the telescope optics). The outer-most pane was made of fused amorphous silica and protected the cabin from micrometeroids, radiation, ...


1

What is the probability that a deep space mission gets hit by such a Solar proton storm? There's a paper by Riley et al. [2018] (https://doi.org/10.1007/s11214-017-0456-3) that estimates the occurrence rate of strong solar storms. So far as I recall, there is a ~10% of chance of a Carrington-level event happening once every decade. The further out from ...


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