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6

We have an answer for Shuttle, and an answer for ISS. Here is the answer for Apollo. The main strategy was to prevent sweating in the first place. The astronauts wore a Liquid Cooling Ventilation Garment (LCVG), which was essentially long underwear with closed tubes that circulated cooling water. Heat was discarded through the sublimator on the suit's ...


2

Airborne dust was observed, which caused great concern among the crew and medical personnel. However, actual post-flight respiratory results were normal. The Apollo Program Summary Report describes dust problems and their mitigation: A troublesome and ever-present problem that was corrected only partly during lunar surface missions was that of dust, On ...


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I'm sure there are different techniques for different space suits, but here's an example of how it is done for the ISS suits: The key to handling body heat and sweat is the Liquid Ventilation Garment, or LVC. This is essentially what looks like a full body thermal underwear, but it is lined with tubes that pass water through them. If you heat up, cold ...


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The shuttle (and ISS) EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) has a condensing heat exchanger as part of its ventilation loop. The condensate is stored, used for cooling, and the excess is drained after each EVA (Extravehicular Activity). Reference: Shuttle Crew Operations Manual: https://www.nasa.gov/centers/johnson/pdf/...


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The potassium deficiency issues on the Apollo missions were at least to some degree due to exertion during the lunar EVAs. Despite the low gravity, the stiffness of pressurized spacesuits made what would otherwise be moderate activity more strenuous; the astronauts sweated off several pounds each according to Biomedical Results of Apollo: All Apollo ...


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