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16

Nice observation, he is just doing it to show off! Check these out: https://twitter.com/cmdr_hadfield/status/326727757109268481?lang=en


1

Interesting question! My answer would be 30 ∘C, it’s the center of the moderate hypothermia range. That range has symptoms we would be looking for (slow heart and breathing) and a few symptoms that could cascade into death, but not immediately. Further explanation: Hypothermia has 3 medically defined core temp ranges, mild (33–35 ∘C), moderate (28–32 ∘C), ...


1

A journey to Mars would be about half a year long. That's as long as astronauts currently are staying on the ISS in their expeditions, in microgravity. So if Soyuz/Dragon/Shuttle astronauts can adjust to 1 g when returning to Earth, they will even better and faster adjust to 0.38 g. And, as mentioned in another answer, Scott Kelly (and other astronauts) were ...


-1

Getting to high velocities is actually very simple. Not much difference between the earlier and later phases of, say Reaching half light speed. It’s the time factor. Even with high thrust, it can take a very long time. Lifetimes with current technology.


3

First of all we are confident enough that special relativity is correct that we know we would not need to worry about the speed as such: everyone is travelling all the time at any speed you like less than $c$ relative to something, and we don't all explode or die or anything. We also know how to deal with the related issues around communication. This is ...


2

No. Speed I don't think there is anything about the speed that would need to be tested. Every time we experimentally test special or general relativity theory we get results that perfectly match. As a reference point, the fastest spacecraft speed designed for is 0.1% $c$, and that's the Parker Solar Probe. For more on that see Parker Solar Probe passing ...


3

Yes. It's still early when Tsibliyev slips out of the quarantine rooms in the Prophylactorum ... Dragonfly, Bryan Burrough, page 68 This was in preparation for the Soyuz-25 mission to Mir. Crewmembers flying to Mir on the Shuttle went through a normal Shuttle quarantine. "We'd like to thank all the people down on Earth," he continued. "There was ...


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