31

No, the blueprints were not destroyed or lost. (This is) a claim John Lewis made in his 1996 book, Mining the Sky, that he went looking for the Saturn 5 blueprints a few years ago and concluded, incredibly, they had been "lost." Paul Shawcross, from NASA's Office of Inspector General, came to the agency's defense in comments published on CCNet -- ...


22

To answer the question literally: you'd be looking for NASA Apollo Trajectory (NAT) data files. The report Apollo Mission 11, Trajectory Reconstruction and Postflight Analysis Volume 1 (PDF) provides a summary for Apollo 11 and mentions that the raw NAT data is available in Volume 2 of the report. I have yet to find Volume 2 though, perhaps because The ...


15

Alright, I went ahead and skimmed wikipedia's orbital capable rockets list and put them all into an excel file along with whether their first launch was a success or a failure! They're sorted by date. Some observations: Data from the Cold War / Space Race era is pretty spotty at points In the early days Russia had many first failures and then very ...


14

The reasons for that date were: There were a number of considerations which determined the launch windows for a lunar landing mission. These considerations included illumination conditions at launch, launch pad azimuth, translunar injection geometry, sun elevation angle at the lunar landing site, illumination conditions at Earth splashdown, and the number ...


9

The lines: Altitude now 21 thousand feet. Still looking very good. Velocity down now to 12 hundred feet per second. and We're now in the approach phase of it, looking good. Altitude 52 hundred feet were spoken, verbatim, during the Apollo 11 landing, but not by Aldrin; according to the PAO Mission Commentary transcript both were spoken by the NASA Public ...


8

I have been looking into this as well. As I have been told by one NASA employee, there is no easy way to get old data, but there is a way if you're willing to go through lots of data. NASA saves old dsn.xml files in an address like so: http://eyes.nasa.gov/dsn/data/1365107113.xml That number is a unix timestamp, so that you can view the XML data at that ...


8

The reading began at 03 14 06 56 of the mission, which is to say, 3 days, 14 hours, and almost 7 minutes after launch. They launched at 12:51 UTC on Dec 21, 1968 (just before 8 a.m. at Cape Canaveral). So, doing the conversion, that was 2 minutes before 10 p.m. on the east coast of the US, and just before 7 p.m. on the west coast. Spacelog.org has the full ...


5

If you skip forward to p11, there's a transcript of her description of the images - it looks like there were three pictures, all connected with the isolation tank tests. It's also worth noting that it was Cobb showing the pictures, not Hart. (Pictures.) So with that we will go ahead with the slides and I will briefly describe these as we go through them. (...


4

There are two small moons of Mars called Phobos and Deimos discovered in 1877. Using orbital mechanics the mass of Mars could be calculated from the observed orbital period and the orbit diameter of the marsian moons. Using the diameter of Mars from astronomical measurements the surface gravity could be calculated. Before the space age, the orbit diameter of ...


4

The other answers show in more visible terms but there is a more direct way of seeing who could have heard it. Remember that radio and light are both electromagnetic waves and we have a direct picture of where light would be visible. Bill Anders's photograph from https://www.nasa.gov/centers/johnson/home/earthrise.html OK not exactly when the verse was ...


4

I'll add that at least in the case of the Rocketdyne F1 Engine (those five huge engines at the bottom of the Saturn V) there seems to be some instances of either missing or never-existed notes and personal knowledge on a large number of small details on the fabrication process (how to assemble, fit, weld, etc...) that would be helpful to build a new F-1 as ...


3

Answering your first paragraph: But did Newton already calculate the Moon's gravity to be about a sixth that of Earth? His calculations were off. Principia Mathematica, volume 3, proposition XXXVII is "To find the force of the Moon to move the sea". Corollary 1 finds the ratio of the Sun's force on the tides to the Moon's force on the tides. ...


3

For the record, @Uwe said this in a comment, which @uhoh considers an answer: The MA-6 Technical Report on http://ibiblio.org/mscorbit/document.html shows some trajectory parameters in Table II on page 26 to 28 of PDF A nice mixture of nautical and statue miles, velocities in foot per second. Good luck for the orbit plot That MA-6 Technical report says, ...


3

One possibility is that he assumed the atmosphere of Venus contributed about the same elevated temperature as it does on Earth. If one uses his believed albedo value of 49.6 for the Earth and performs the same Stefan-Boltzmann calculation as for Venus, one ends up with a temperature of 236K, 27 degrees lower than for Venus. He may simply have believed (or ...


2

I have seen pictures from CubeSats, but you are right they are hard to come by. In addition to the camera failures you allude to, there is the issue that many CubeSats (especially those with cameras) are student projects with poor followup. One other complication is that the failure to take a (nice) picture can often be due to bad attitude control, so it ...


2

According to an article in the NASA ADS journal, Measuring The Moon's Mass: It can be seen that the lunar mass was known to about +/- 50% between 1687 and 1755, +/- 10% between 1755 and 1830, +/- 3% between 1830 and 1900, +/- 0.15% between 1900 and 1968, and +/- 0.0001% between 1968 and the present [2002]. In 1900, the size and distance of the moon was ...


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