72

Apollo 11 mission had two modules Lunar module - which descent to moon carrying two astronauts command / service module- CSM was designed to return astronauts from the lunar surface on a direct-descent mission to earth and splash down. Direct telecast from the Command service module is not possible but CSM stored the recording of conversation which is ...


39

From this article, and this article: Live television was transmitted from the moon to 3 grounds stations, two in Australia and one in California. The signal was converted to a standard broadcast signal and then sent to Houston, via, satellite, landline or microwave antenna. These graphics show the path of the television feed. Bottom line is, the ...


21

The slow-scan signal mentioned in the other replies had to be converted to broadcast video. This was done by playing back (pdf) the slow-scan video on a kinescope, and reading the image with a broadcast TV camera. The setup also involved a magnetic video disc recorder which briefly stored each frame of video (so that one recorded frame could be used to fill ...


12

Spacecraft tracking in Apollo was done by the Unified S-Band (USB) system. It was called "unified" because it combined voice, tracking, telemetry, and computer commands. There was a completely different communication system (VHF) which did voice and television, but not tracking, and is not related to this question. Apollo 8 was an early manned ...


6

That antenna is a Cassegrain horn (or 'casshorn'). This is an evolution of the earlier horn-reflector antenna (paper that describes the design), where a horn radiates into a parabolic surface: The Cassegrain horn reduces the antenna size (long distance between the horn and parabolic dish) by introducing a hyperbolic reflector: The feed is now at position ...


6

The photo you have is of DSS-46, which is actually at Tidbinbilla. It used to be DSS-44 at Honeysuckle Creek, but when that site was closed in 1981 the antenna was moved. When it was re-assembled in 83, a new self-supporting secondary reflector replaced the old quadripod (source). Here's a better photo of that bit: (Crop from 2005 image here by Eric Fehr) ...


5

Most probably no. I couldn't find any list of stations on duty, but it can easily be "proven" that it wasn't possible. On one hand, all landings happened shortly after local sunrise, and all within a 54° range (between the 23W of Apollo 12 and 30E of Apollo 17) List of Apollo landing sites. As the moon is tidally locked to the earth, those 54° correspond ...


2

There are at least not any others in the onboard and air-to-ground transcripts, as far as I can see https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/mission_trans/AS08_TEC.PDF https://historycollection.jsc.nasa.gov/JSCHistoryPortal/history/mission_trans/AS08_CM.PDF Honeysuckle communications have been preserved and digitized, available for ...


2

I'll add a little bit to Hobbes' excellent answer and detective work. I looked up a physical copy of the book linked there; Practical Conic Sections: The Geometrical Properties of Ellipses, Parabolas and Hyperbolas by J. W. Downs, Dover, NY, 1993 and found it a short but incredibly interesting and informative little book, if you like reading about conic ...


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