26

SRB Ignition SRB ignition can occur only when a manual lock pin from each SRB safe and arm device has been removed. The ground crew removes the pin during prelaunch activities. At T minus five minutes, the SRB safe and arm device is rotated to the arm position. The solid rocket motor ignition commands are issued when the three SSMEs are at or ...


17

For the Space Shuttle Main Engine, four checks were done to set the "Ignition Confirmed" condition. The High Pressure Fuel Turbopump shaft speed was checked against a minimum limit. The Main Combustion Chamber pressure was checked twice, once against a minimum limit, and once to ensure it was between an upper and lower bound. The Antiflood Valve was checked ...


9

In order to start the engine, you first have to start the gas generator to run the turbo pump. This means getting a flame up past the turbine and igniting the mixture in the gas generator combustion chamber. This seems unlikely. Assuming the gas generator is somehow running but the main combustion chamber hasn't ignited, the propellant leaving the nozzle ...


6

How do you confirm ignition in the combustion chamber of a rocket? Sometimes, you don't. Pressure sensors, flow sensors, and such are yet another device that can fail. Moreover, what if nothing can be done / needs to be done if ignition fails to occur? In the case of the Shuttle (Organic Marble's answer), all three main engines were needed for launch. ...


4

Spark igniters are commonly used for hydrogen-fueled engines, but chemical igniters are preferred for kerosene engines, largely because of the concerns you mention. There's more detail in this Q & A.


2

Perhaps there's some confusion in the terminology? At least for the Space Shuttle Main Engine, the Augmented Spark Igniters didn't fire for the whole burn. The igniters turn off after 4.4 seconds while the ignition flame continues in order to prevent intermittent and possibly damaging blowback from the main combustion area. This also ...


1

The design shown in the patent application doesn't look typical of common IC engines; I'll guess it was an idea someone had that may or may not be a real improvement. Engines I am familiar with have no such pre-chamber; the spark fires in the "main" combustion chamber, but I don't think that's relevant to the question. The NASA device looks like it's ...


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