34

Yes, but it requires exceptional resolution. The GeoEye-1 satellite has 0.41 m resolution, and it has been used to count animals. Here you can see a picture it took of wildebeests: Image Credit: ITC The black and white image is the satellite image (though GeoEye-1 can do color imagery as well in 1.65 m resolution). The tiny dots peppered across the park ...


30

Why not? Because we can't. We don't have full-time communication with Curiosity: Curiosity sends data to the Mars Reconnaisance Orbiter and Mars Odyssey. These are overhead twice a day at 12-hour intervals. MRO and MO are in sun-synchronous orbits, so the planet rotates underneath the orbiter and they cover the entire planet in 1 day. Both are in orbits ...


19

It is technically possible to see big animals, but we are still far from being able to identify them without context information. For commercial satellites, the highest spatial resolution is 31 cm at nadir view (worldview-3), but only in the panchromatic band. For colors, the resolution is still very good (1m24) but only large animals are visible. Only ...


14

The principles of Difference Image Analysis (DIA) or Difference Imaging, which is very common in modern astronomy for finding new transient sources (e.g. asteroids, variable stars, including microlensing events, and supernovae), is simple in principle but complicated by a lot of practical details caused by real-world observations. The basis, which is set ...


10

According to this article, The red hot lava flowing from Mount Etna can be seen clearly in the image from Sentinel-2A. The surrounding snow has been processed in blue to distinguish from the clouds. The Sentinel satellites use multispectral imagers: 13 spectral channels incorporating four visible and near-infrared bands at 10 m resolution, six red-...


8

The 'bands' described here are regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. A band doesn't physically look like anything since it's just a range of wavelengths. However, different wavelengths are good for imaging different physical phenomena. So WorldView-3 has sensors for 4 groups of bands, but 29 bands in total. The page you linked includes this image which ...


7

The image was taked by the OCAMS instrument. OCAMS uses CCD (Charge Coupled Device) focal planes. The charges generated by the incident light in each frame are transferred down the columns one pixel at a time. If there is an especially bright object, it may affect the remainder of the column. Note: OCAMS is a suite of cameras: PolyCam, MapCam, and ...


7

The line you are referencing is because the Earth is very bright on a "black" background. It happens as the light overpowers the image chip, similar to the Starburst pattern bright headlights make on dark nights.


6

The usual approach to tracking a dim, moving object is to move the camera to follow a predicted track while making a long exposure. Synthetic tracking starts with a series of sequential quick exposures. If the camera were mechanically tracking, you could just overlay and add them. (The best statistical method for combining is a little more complicated, but ...


6

- First count of individual birds from space - First complete count of an entire species population The 4-may-2017 BBC News item Albatrosses counted from space describes an effort to automate the analysis of WorldView-3 (Wikipedia and EOPortal) photos in order to count nesting Albatrosses. It is also described in this week's BBC Podcast of Science in ...


5

It appears that the Eastman Kodak "Bimat" system used on the Lunar Orbiters was completely dry - in the sense that there were no free liquids. You can read about the process in detail at the Central Intelligence Agency's library website in this document. The pdf format used does not allow copying text, so here is an brief excerpt. No free liquids are ...


5

Whales seen from space, and not by the USS Enterprise. The BBC item Scientists count whales from space includes an audio interview with Hannah Cubaynes and says: The researchers, from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), have been using the highest resolution satellite pictures available. Even when taken from 620km up, this imagery is sharp enough to capture ...


5

The streak is perfectly aligned to the vertical axis. Assuming that it hasn't been rotated, it is likely to be an artifact from imager chip, which may have saturated or overloaded - more charge/pixel than they can linearly process. However I noticed that the color of the streak is pure white, which is hard to understand unless it is caused specifically by ...


4

Largest original: https://www.asteroidmission.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/EGA_Plus_10_mapcam_Earth_Moon.png Blooming is vertical while streaking is horizontal: Some people use blooming and streaking interchangeably, while others use them as synonymous with each other. Some CCDs have anti-blooming gates which mostly inhibit the problem but can result in ...


4

I found the answer. At least for Meteor-M. Missing lines in the center of image is a satellite defect. According to the link, this could happen every ~6mins due to internal buffer overflow.


2

2012rcampion found a nice paper detailing all the visual effects caused by the optical system of the satellite. According to the paper, the many small artifacts are caused by diffraction: The optical setup of each AIA telescope is characterized by structures with uniform wire meshes used to support the thin filters that create the EUV passbands. ...


2

According to your linked document the video signal from the vidicon (in record mode) The composite video resulting from vidicon readout is applied through the emitter follower to the modulator and produces frequency variations in the 85-kc subcarrier oscillator. This FM signal is then applied through the head driver to the video record head of the tape ...


2

Okay this isn't a complete answer but it may be of some help until you can find a better site for your question. See also this answer for more information. Use a simple pinhole camera approximation where a ray that passes from the object through the center of the camera's pupil travels a straight line from object to the focal plane. Assuming that the ...


1

This is a great question! Parallax and stellar positions To measure an object's parallax assuming no proper motion, we can get by with as few as two images of a foreground (moving) star against a background of several "fixed" stars. We only need enough resolution to make out one star's diffraction (Airy) disk from the other stars with enough precision to ...


1

These images are taken during local night. i.e. LRO is flying over an area of the moon which is not illuminated by the sun at that time. An easy way to confirm this is to click on the "info" icon next to the image in USGS Pilot, and look at the "local solar time" field. If the time is between about 06:00 (6am) and 18:00 (6pm), you will see a dark image or a ...


1

The BBC News article Satellites to monitor whale strandings from space describes the use of the WordView-2 satellite to image mass standings of whales, and references the recent Open Access (non-paywalled) paper in PLOS ONE Using remote sensing to detect whale strandings in remote areas: The case of sei whales mass mortality in Chilean Patagonia which ...


1

In the NPR news article Have You Herd? Farmer Writes A Memoo Using Cows And Satellite Imagery the following YouTube video is linked. Lower your volume slightly before playing: Although I am not sure yet, (and so have asked this question) I think that the image below is that of some cows saying "Hi!" taken by a 4-inch telescope in a 3U cubesat, or Dove.


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