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29

The 1960s and 1970s were a period of rapid technological development, so it's not actually surprising that the relatively new field of electronic imaging advanced so far in that five-year period. Especially for spacecraft applications, where you have severe power and weight constraints and a harsh operating environment, compromises had to be made in quality -...


28

It is not only the progress in imaging over that period. Voyager was a more ambitious and expensive mission in general. The mass of Pioneer 11 was 259 kg, while that of Voyager was 825.5. That extra mass included a proper camera with multiple lenses on a steerable platform. This is different from the Pioneer spacecraft, which were spin-stabilized. The ...


16

It was not a thermal image at all. It is an optical image that has been captured by Orbiter of the lander spot and not thermal image as reported by others media houses. OHRC is same like our human eye. Since it consists of only one spectral band in visible region, so Image will be of gray scale, Not color image. https://twitter.com/Madrassan_Pinky/...


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Detecting chlorophyl on exoplanets is definitely something people are interested in: see this paper (published as "Detecting biomarkers on an exo-Earth", Timothy D. Brandt, David S. Spiegel, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Sep 2014, 111 (37) 13278-13283; DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1407296111), for instance. On the assumption that people are ...


6

Thanks to @jkavalik for the informative answer and helpful links! As is pointed out there, there seems to be an abundance of false social media accounts claiming to be K. Silvan. From today's Sep 09, 2019 post: Regarding Social Media Accounts in the name of Kailasavadivoo Sivan, Chairman ISRO: It has been noted that social media accounts in the name of ...


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The above image is part of this 360$⁰$ panorama that was captured on Mars by the Mastcam on NASA's Curiosity rover on June 18,2019, sol 2440. When you look at the features on that part you can see they resemble those on the image with the bright spot, which would have been near the upper right corner. The image below is also part of that panorama image, ...


3

Google Maps Moon likely uses a Simple Cylindrical projection for storing their map data. This is fine for the majority of the globe, but there are problems at the poles. Here are a few reasons why imagery of the poles is problematic: The data is prone to discontinuities because it has the entire top or bottom edge of the rectangular projection converging on ...


2

The answer is that it does it by scanning. There are two SWAN instruments, each of which sees an area of $5^\circ \times 5^\circ$ at any one time: with a $25$-pixel sensor where each pixel is therefore one square degree. One of these instruments looks at the northern hemisphere, and the other the southern hemisphere, and both of them are scanned by ...


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The Longjiangs weren't the first. Here's a single snapshot taken by Japan's 1998 Nozomi, testing its camera en route to Mars (which is why it was far enough away). Much earlier, Apollo 16 got almost the whole disc. Here's how they did it.


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The strong distortions and star-like stripes are an artifact of Googles' image processing. For comparison, here is a screenshot of our own South Pole : I increased the contrast to make the artifacts more visible - the ice itself just has less contrast than the rocky features of the Moon.


2

The lighting is different at the poles. The sun is always very close to the horizon. There are some crater floors at the poles that never see sunlight. These crater floors are always inky black. Likewise there are polar plateaus and mountain tops that enjoy nearly constant sunlight. Shadows cast across these plateaus are always long though. And these long ...


1

There's new gamma-ray data for the Moon! It's from the Fermi gamma ray telescope, (also NASA) From Moon Glows Brighter Than Sun in Images From NASA's Fermi Click for full size or go to the original link The Moon shines brightly in gamma rays as seen in this time sequence from NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Each 5-by-5-degree image is centered ...


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