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From McDowell tweet of Aug. 15th, 7:17AM 37 debris objects (green) have been cataloged so far from the breakup - there are likely to be more. the most obvious interpretation is that the green lines represent the altitude vs time of the fragments. The blue line corresponds to the altitude of Yunhai 1-02 (which shows its in-orbit maneuvers after the impact ...


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As Simba's answer explained, the probability of a spacecraft accidentally colliding with an asteroid is very low. On average, asteroids in the Main Belt are hundreds of thousands of kilometers apart. If you could stand on an asteroid, you probably wouldn't even be able to see another asteroid with your unaided eyes. (The exception to this is when an asteroid ...


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This is an interesting question! Partial answer! I don't know about the frequency of Martian meteorites, but for a given one we can estimate its terminal velocity (if it reaches it) and kinetic energy. If it doesn't reach terminal velocity, then it's going to be going a heck of a lot faster and have a heck of a lot squared more kinetic energy. A 1 cm radius ...


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Principle 9 of the UN's Principles Relevant to the Use of Nuclear Power Sources In Outer Space says that whoever caused the debris field to happen must pay to clean up the mess.


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First thing, first. The term “Kessler syndrome” and the concept it describes (uncontrollable chain collisions in space) may be familiar to most in Space SE. It would nevertheless be useful to revisit the publications by D. Kessler. No doubt, there are many who argue that this theory is an alarmist one. The relevant publications are: The 1978 paper Collision ...


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The original OP's question Could meteorites prevent Mars exploration? has been transformed into another question that was answered, though partially, into energetic calculations and probabilistic calculations. I will try to answer the original question. First, how can a meteorite prevent colonization of a planet? You must accept that when people take all ...


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Uhoh's answer neatly covers the damage a given meteorite would have upon impact. I'll add to that approach the likelihood that a meteorite even strikes Mars or Earth. A Martian year is 1.6 times longer than an Earth year (686.96 days versus 365.25). At first approximation, on average, a planet is just as likely to be hit by a meteorite at any point in its ...


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