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In early versions of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME), the main injector was baffled. The baffles were formed by extra-long liquid oxygen posts protruding from the injector face. Block IA engines and later removed the baffles. (See "Taxonomy of the SSME" in this answer.) The injectors on the preburners were also baffled in a similar manner. As far as ...


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Partial answer In broad terms, about what velocity do the propellants come out of the injector plate? For the instrumented 50 klbf LOX/LH2 engine used in this study they varied the LH2 injection velocity from ~300 to ~700 ft/s. LO2 injection velocity was about 1/6th of that. For the other part of the question, it seems what you are asking is, what ...


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There are different numbers on this NASA page about Saturn V: Finally, the fuel squirted through 3 700 orifices into the combustion chamber to mix with the oxidizer, which entered through 2 600 other orifices in the injector face If the hole numbers of the question are correct, (1428 Oxidizer holes and (approximately) 1404 Fuel (RP1) holes) the explanation ...


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As noted in my comment on Organic Marble's answer, the RD170 baffles look very similar to the SSME, but with 6 radial baffles instead of 5. Using nozzles to make baffles is a win-win. You don't lose any area and the propellant keeps them cool. According to this the baffles on the Saturn V's F-1 engines were cooled by fuel. At first glance there don't ...


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Sutton, 4th edition, page 288 gives: $\dot w = C_d A \sqrt {2g \rho \Delta p} $ so, trivial to arrange for $\Delta p $....but you have to get $C_d $ somehow. Sutton gives the following chart This is probably OK for estimation. Real-world it's probably first CFD and then measured experimentally.


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