57

Yes, it really happened. It took place at the Lockheed Martin Space Systems factory in Sunnyvale, California. As the team was turning the satellite into a horizontal position, they found out that the twenty-four bolts that were supposed to hold it in place had been removed by a technician - and the action was never documented. According to NASA: The ...


17

The story behind this is one of several layers of procedures, as is documented in a review of NASA "mishaps". Essentially, the story comes down to the following sequence of events: A team prepared the vibration testing, including putting the bolts on. A second team removed the bolts, to use for another purpose. This removal was not documented at the time. ...


15

This satellite, NOAA-19 or NOAA-N Prime was launched in February 2009. The pictured incident happened in 2003: The spacecraft has had a troubled history at Lockheed Martin’s Sunnyvale, Calif., factory. After it suffered significant damage when it tipped over on the factory floor in September 2003, the contractor used fees earned on the NOAA spacecraft it ...


12

Payloads come in different shapes and sizes. To put them on a specific launch vehicle, you need to either design the payload to fit perfectly onto the rocket or you need some sort of adapter to mount it in place. It's also common to launch multiple payloads with a single launch, so you need some mechanism to separate the different payloads and release them ...


9

The physical adapter is the easy part. These have standard dimensions. Commercial launch providers were quick to realize it'd be advantageous to offer compatibility. E.g. the Ariane 5 payload fairing dimensions were based on the Shuttle payload bay. Looking at the user manuals for various launchers, you can see the differences: vibration and other ...


9

I was able to find a few requirements for CubeSats that are based upon its integration into a larger system which includes a primary payload (all instances of primary payload are bolded in quotes below, emphasis mine): CubeSats shall not present any danger to neighboring CubeSats in the P-POD, the LV, or primary payloads: 2.2.1.1 All parts shall ...


5

Pallava Bagla is known to misrepresent or exaggerate things unfortunately and poor English of Chairman and edited out answer makes it a mess further. The spacecraft they are talking about is Microsat-TD (~130 kg) an experimental earth imaging satellite meant to operate at ~350 km orbit, and it wasn't 'built' in 24 hrs. But its final payload integration and ...


5

According to the Falcon 9 Users Guide, section 4.3.1, satellites must be able to withstand a lateral load of +/- 2 g, so the lateral load of 1 g when the rocket is horizontal is still within the envelope of the loads during launch.


5

In response to the part of the question "Could one design a spacecraft to go with at least three out of these four?" the answer is yes. This is actually quite common for geostationary communications satellites. It is quite typical for a customer to request that competing satellite manufacturers make their satellites compatible with two or three launch ...


5

Changing launchers late in the development cycle is unusual, but it does happen. For example, the next Cygnus mission (OA-7) has been moved on to an Altas 5 from Antares in order to carry more cargo. In this case, it appears that OA and NASA made the decision to switch simply because the Atlas 5 can carry more mass to orbit. The Cygnus missions OA-4 and OA-...


3

The Indian media has habit of exaggerating and diluting the facts. As can be easily seen, the point where he was clarifying about microsat, the video was cut. He is actually is a great systems engineer. Also, one or more places the video seem to be edited where he was clarifying the statements made by the reporter. On one face the media here compares with ...


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