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There is some misconception involved in the phrasing of the question. Take a look at the ideal gas law: $$\frac{pV}{nT}=\rm constant$$ $p$: pressure; $V$: volume; $n$ amount of substance ("mass" of the gas); $T$: temperature What you need to do in order to increase the swimability is to increase the density, which is the ratio $\frac{n}{V}$. ...


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To improve swimmability, we need to increase gas density, not gas pressure - although both are related, it would be ideal to increase the former without increasing the latter. Density of fluids can be increased by solids in suspension, as can be shown by hot pyroclastic flows denser than colder clean air. In Earth solids in suspension tend to settle due to ...


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Would a higher air pressure on the ISS or elsewhere make it easier to “swim” in microgravity? Yes! But what's really important is the density, so instead of pressuring "normal air" you can just make a denser atmospheric mixture and keep the pressure the same. This answer says If you want the air to be 5 times easier to swim, you can just replace ...


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If you want the air to be 5 times easier to swim, you can just replace the nitrogen with xenon and increase the density without increasing pressure.


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Partial answer to "Is it a proposal space agencies should consider?" Unlikely. Increasing the differential pressure by a factor of 5 would mean that the modules would have to be quite a bit stronger and therefore presumably costlier and/or heavier. (As pointed out in the other answer) If getting marooned in midair is a constant problem (AFAIK it ...


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The astronauts would get nitrogen narcosis even worse than in 40 m deep water breathing air. In both cases the gas pressure is 5 bar, but under water the partial pressure of nitrogen is 3.95 bar but in the spaceship 4.79 bar. This is equivalent to about 50 m deep water breathing air. See Wikipedia for signs and symptoms of the narcosis. These symptoms would ...


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The dinosaur is the unofficial third crew member (in the DM2 webcast also sometimes jokingly referred to as a stowaway) of SpX-DM2. It was chosen by Doug Hurley's and Bob Behnken's sons, who are both dinosaur fans. Plush toys have somewhat of a tradition of being used as a zero-G indicator in spacecraft, since they are small, lightweight, fun, and pose no ...


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I mentioned this in a comment, but an official answer is needed. The document in your 3rd link is the official-as-it-gets NASA document The International Space Station - Operating an Outpost in the New Frontier The ISS Flight Rules would be the authoritative source, but NASA does not publish them. From p.145 in the link.


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There was no problem receiving 300 km far 3G cells in airplane 10 km above the ground as horizon distance at this flight level is 357 km so line of sight range is far enough and no obstacles were in the way. Received signal strength (RSRP) was around -90 dBm quite often but Ec/Io was bad (-14 to -18 dB) as I received tens of interfering cells at one time. ...


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I asked Founding Director of the Space for Art Foundation and former astronaut Nicole Stott about this, she kindly gave me permission to quote her. That is meant to be a protective kind of shield for the rack - to keep people from hitting the rack or using the hand rails for translation (so the rack stays as "still" as possible for the micro-g ...


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NASA has been considering the idea of integrating HUDs into spacesuits for a while. This slide deck gives a decent overview of some of the ideas that the agency has been considering. NASA has also received suggestions from the public (for instance, via its Space Apps Challenge) on what a spacesuit HUD might look like. ESA has also conducted research into ...


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Based on @Martin Schroeder comment. I found out a cargo with water supply: https://spaceflight101.com/progress-ms-03/cargo-manifest/ 420kg of water out of a 2405kg payload. Presumably, There are lighter and heavier shipments.


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If you want an example manifest for one logistics flight, that's available. Search terms...suggest "ISS Cargo Manifest" From SpaceX 2 Cargo Manifest (see link for details) 81 kg of crew supplies (food, clothes, paperwork) 25 kg of international partner experiments 323 kg of NASA experiments 3 kg of EVA tools 135 kg of ISS hardware 8 kg of PC parts ...


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