Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

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Before getting to the technical feasibility of moving the ISS, I feel obligated to point out that operating it at L1 or lunar orbit is impractical for a few reasons: The ISS is designed for the radiation environment of low Earth orbit. Outside of low Earth orbit, without the protection of the Van Allen radiation belt, crew aboard the station will receive ...


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With an elliptical orbit we can't have any fixed Lagrange points, not even the unstable ones aligned with the massive bodies, because the massive bodues are not fixed rekative to each other unless we make a very contrived reference frame. We can, however, conceive of trojan-like objects with the following properties: *The mean orbit period about a primary ...


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They do of course in the case of the circular orbit, but that is rather trivial. What about elliptical orbits with considerable eccentricity? Lagrange points aren't really defined for elliptical orbits. They are defined only in the Circular Restricted Three Body Problem (CRTBP or CR3BP). Two bodies have significant masses and the third does not (that's the ...


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Any two gravitational systems will have Lagrange points where the fields cancel each other out or compliment each other in a way that produces a stable "parking place". In fact it is a bit more complex that that in that the gravitational field at any point in space is affected by the gravity of every subatomic particle in the entire universe. There is are ...


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It couldn't stay at L1 for longer than a few months. The electrochromic material's degradation due to ultraviolet radiation would limit how long the panels would operate. On Earth, outdoors, at sea level, they would last at most "a few years." Earth's atmosphere blocks 77% of UV, so the UV just outside Earth's atmosphere is 4.3 times stronger. Venus is ...


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