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4

Collecting the core list from 2019-Jan 2021, we get 38 flights. Eight new cores are introduced (Ignoring Heavy launches) and three cores are lost/expended. Jan 2019 - 1049.2 Feb 2019 - 1048.3 Mar 2019 - 1051.1 (new core) May 2019 - 1056.1 (new core) May 2019 - 1049.3 Jun 2019 - 1051.2 Jul 2019 - 1056.2 Aug 2019 - 1047.3 - lost Nov 2019 - 1048.4 Dec 2019 - ...


-4

From an "agricultural" (i.e. using words that even I can understand) point of view: I'm a long-time long-distance motorcyclist. People ask me why I check my tire pressures so often during a long trip. Here's how I explain that: "Let's say I top off my tires in western CO, up to their recommended pressures. A few days later, I find myself in ...


10

Absolutely not. Besides the minor issue that the shuttle is retired and no longer flyable, its aerodynamic performance during the descent and landing phase is dependent on the density of Earth's atmosphere. Mars' atmosphere is about 1/100 as dense, so the shuttle won't have the lift or controllability that it needs to land.


2

A short summary: The HLS needs to be able to support human life. The overarching goal is to land humans on the Moon and safely return them to the Earth. The HLS needs to be able to land on and later launch from the surface of the Moon. This is the second half of that overarching goal. The HLS needs to be able to dock with the Gateway / Orion. The base ...


4

What you are describing are the header tanks, that were present in the SN8 vehicle and should be in all Starship vehicles going forward. A header tank is a smaller tank, that holds fuel or oxidizer. The Starship's CH4 header tanks is roughly a sphere, buried in the middle of the common dome (divider between LOX tank at the bottom, and CH4 tank on the top), ...


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