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Liftoff at T-0 is common, but not universal. For Ariane 5, T-0 is the moment of ignition of the Vulcain engine. In a nominal countdown, checkout takes 6 seconds, and the solids are ignited when checkout finishes, leading to liftoff at T+7. I suspect there is some flexibility built into this: if the checkout takes longer, this is easily accommodated and ...


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As such, I was wondering if there is a way to accurately track both position and velocity for the launch vehicle's ascent to orbit. How would tracking multiple reference targets be achieved during a real launch event? You cannot. Position and velocity are dependent variables (velocity is by definition the time derivative of the position), so controlling one ...


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As such, I was wondering if there is a way to accurately track both position and velocity for the launch vehicle's ascent to orbit. If possible, have more accurate actuators and reference models. Improves the tracking of states easier. But since there is a relationship between position and velocity you cannot properly control both. The reason is simple: If ...


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It's virtually impossible to keep track of all the small launch vehicles. Most of the big ones are included at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comparison_of_orbital_launch_systems Vehicles still in development are listed in tan colour. Note that retired launchers are in a separate table at the bottom, so don't go looking for the Saturn V in the top table....


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No, there isn't an authoritative source. The 131 small launchers mentioned in the article you linked, are from "a long-running effort to track small launch vehicle efforts" -- but won't include any that they haven't heard of. The 2018 list and its criteria includes the ominous phrase "We have found out about many of these vehicles by word of mouth ...


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