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62

For the Falcon 9, the worst-case point should be near the end of the second-stage burn, when the mass of Alison Goldfrapp's ex is largest relative to the remaining mass of the rocket, and only a single engine is available to steer, with a relatively short moment arm between the gimbal and the center of gravity. I assume that we are not launching any non-ex-...


53

This is a point worth emphasizing: When you dive off a high dive, or go on a free fall ride at an amusement park, or fly on Virgin Galactic, you are experiencing weightlessness in exactly the same way as the astronauts on the ISS. At the height of the ISS, the earth's gravity is about 90% of what it is at sea level. You could launch a rocket straight up and ...


33

Yes, for a few minutes. It is similar to what is done in a zero gravity airplane flight, but a longer period of time. Also, orbital weightlessness is basically the same thing, the spacecraft and you are falling at the same rate.


10

Generally no, max Q is typically well above mach 1. (I think there’s another question about this on the site.) Dynamic pressure is proportional to velocity squared, so speed rather than drag coefficient dominates the pressure curve.


9

SkyVector shows the two current TFRs (temporary flight restrictions) around Cape Canaveral related to the SpaceX launch: The accompanying information with these TFRs say: No pilots may operate an aircraft in the areas covered by this NOTAM (except as described). With the exceptions being "[aircraft] supporting the recovery of the space vehicle" ...


5

I've done this before, on the latest Falcon Heavy launch. Although the satellites we were working with were a good bit larger than most cubesats. Essentially, the launch provider gives you state vectors, and then someone in the chain needs the STK ODTK to turn the state vectors into TLEs. Unfortunately I think the license for that is around $60k. I would be ...


5

New Horizons had a launch mass of 478 kg, of which 77 kg was propellant, but only around 47.5 kg of that was for course changes, with the rest reserved for attitude control. New Horizons was launched at a speed of 16.26 km/s, which put it on a solar system escape trajectory. It then also received a speed boost from the Jupiter flyby. Fuel requirements New ...


2

The answer to question 1 will come from the chosen trajectory's arrival $V_\inf$ (hyperbolic excess velocity). The answer to question 2 will come from the chosen trajectory's launch $C3$ (characteristic energy). The two are coupled to an individual trajectory dependent on dates and routes (which planets to flyby). Luckily, I have (student) experience in ...


1

I am not a lawyer. Still, I would like to submit this strawman answer to my own question, for you to criticize. The language of Article VI is open to different interpretations. I can see at least two, and mutually contradicting. The first, call it the “strict interpretation”, is that ONLY the US can “authorize and continuously supervise” the activities of ...


1

I use https://www.myspaceteacher.com/Upcominglaunches/ to have a look at upcoming launches. This is probably a bit of a late reply but I came across your post now and want to start contributing more on space.stackexchange.


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