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34

TL;DR: it is inefficient. You should play some Kerbal Space Program and see for yourself the effects of travel in this way. Assuming, of course, you didn't really want to enter the orbit, but wanted to e.g. go to the Moon or deep space probing. Especially in conjunction with Wikipedia's note about not having to attain escape velocity to leave gravity well....


9

Your question is, as I understand it, pointing out that there are two ways to get from the surface of the Earth to the surface of the Moon. Way one: Burn upwards until through the thickest part of the atmosphere to avoid aero drag. Burn sideways to attain orbital velocity and raise apogee and perigee into space. From Earth orbit, burn prograde to attain ...


3

For getting to the moon specifically, there's an extra problem, on top of what's already been mentioned: presumably, your objective when you get to the moon is to either orbit it or do a nice gentle landing on it (if your objective is to turn yourself into a cloud of shrapnel spread over a large area of regolith, feel free to take your approach). That is: ...


2

One thing I wondered about is whether this idea is plausible at all. I think it's pretty clearly not for reasons I'll go into below, but the initial question is can you make something strong enough to do what you want to do ignoring practical considerations? In theory So, first of all let's consider a simplified thing: two equal masses connected by some ...


1

Going to a celestial body, entering orbit, then having to shed all that orbital velocity. If you were travelling slow enough as it is, and slowly decelerating all the way, counteracting gravity, it would take you loads of time probably, but surely there must be another reason why it can't be done, else why wouldn't we do it. Since others (specially Starfish ...


1

What is the thing that prevents you from... going fast and then steering up... Isn't it the atmosphere? Going up first then speeding up makes spaceflight possible. No rocket could accelerate to mach-20+ at 1 atmosphere and then sustain it all the way to space.


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