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7

For the shuttle program, the water was not recovered. The water that was not vaporized ran through concrete channels and was collected in two holding ponds. (NASA photo, annotations mine). The water was later pumped out and allowed to soak into the sandy soil. The discharge of deluge and firex water (during the launch of each Space Shuttle) resulted ...


12

I didn't dig too hard for sources because this is probably a very minor expansion on top of the other answers, but WHICH payloads might require vertical integration? Ones with big stinking mirrors inside like spy satellites and space telescopes. This reddit post lays out some rationale: This is mostly telescopes like Hubble. They have a very delicate ...


7

Something of a guess but it sounds plausible: Satellite propulsion systems that use surface tension devices to separate the pressurant gas from the propellant may have some orientation constraints to prevent gas bubbles being trapped in the surface tension device (aka propellant management device, PMD). There are several types of PMD, some are rather ...


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Payloads are attached to (expendable or vertical landing) vertical take off vehicles at the ends where they touch. Given satellites weigh several tonnes, and are several meters in length horizontal integration puts a lot of torque on that connection, and to lesser degrees on other parts of the spacecraft structure. Reinforcing the spacecraft to withstand ...


7

Read the whole article: Most importantly, the tower would allow SpaceX technicians to crane certain US military payloads – encapsulated inside a Falcon payload fairing – onto the top of the rocket. At the end of the day, that’s really the only reason SpaceX needs such a tower – certain customers (the US military and, to a lesser extent, NASA) have ...


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