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85

It's required to by the legislation that created it, the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958. FUNCTIONS OF THE ADMINISTRATION Sec. 203. (a) The Administration, in order to carry out the purpose of this Act, shall-- (1) plan, direct, and conduct aeronautical and space activities; (2) arrange for participation by the scientific ...


39

I drive by it every day... We do it for the benefit of all: Really though, the government has a vested interest in making sure we (the United States) remain a technology leader in the world because it's good for the economy. Private industry is usually too risk-averse to undertake basic research with no current applications even though the payoff can ...


21

Because they're scientists, and publishing your results is what scientists do. There's a reason why the final step of basically every research methodology used in academia is "publish your results" (and I'm only saying "basically every" because I'm not an expert on the field of research methodologies, so while it's possible that there's one obscure one out ...


9

There are two schools of thought discussed in Asteroid Mining: International and Legal Aspects by Frans G. von der Dunk: Perspective 1: The US and countries like Luxembourg believe that any resources mined on the moon are global commons which allows licensed entities to make a commercial business out of mining the moon. (see page 96 in the document and ...


9

NASA is not a stand-alone thing. It is the civilian part of the space industry, and partially, the military industry of the USA. They work together. For example: they publish the photos, what the Hubble made. This is very useful for the whole humanity. But the same (or very similar) technologies are used in spy satellites, too. Only the watch not the sky, ...


9

tl;dr: Do owners of reentering spacecraft notify the countries' whose airspace they are likely to violate and seek permission? No, there is no requirement for notification, and in most instances there is no notification. There are three main guiding principles of international space law that could apply. The Outer Space Treaty has a vague reference ...


6

No. There are at least 2 government agencies that must approve of a launch under normal circumstances, the FCC and the FAA. Per FCC guidelines Satellites authorized by an administration other than the United States do not require any FCC approval if earth station operations are exclusively outside the United States. The FAA requirements are as ...


6

There are two things about such an action that must be considered: what happens on the station itself so that the crew can protect themselves, and what happens once the crew returns. To the first part, NASA does have a policy in place to handle an out of control astronaut. This article references but does not provide a link to the protocol. However, it's ...


5

Yes, but it's not so much legal "issues" as it is a simple legal requirement of getting approval to maintain safety in the air. As @BigMoneySeth's link shows us, an unmanned, free balloon must be registered with the FAA. Ok, but that doesn't help us in Antarctica just yet, since Antarctica is a mishmash of nations operating under a treaty. So we need to ...


4

Seems Like It Absurd hypotheticals aside, the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) specifies in Article V: [E]ach Partner shall retain jurisdiction and control over the elements it registers...and over personnel in or on the Space Station who are its nationals. This ESA resource summarizes: The Intergovernmental Agreement allows the Space Station ...


4

The Space Liability Convention of the Outer Space Treaty holds that whichever state controls the territory a spacecraft/object is launched from is responsible for any damages it causes. India is a signatory of the treaty, so if the debris field results in damage to the ISS, the appropriate states (depending on what specifically was damaged) can file for ...


3

Spectrum management is both science and art. One way of avoiding interference is using separate frequencies for different systems. If the spectrum can be confined to national boundaries, then usually it is licensed by the country administration (FCC, Ofcom etc.) however, if you want to operate a global system, the allocation must be done on an international ...


3

The government shut down did not stop SpaceX from launching an iridium satalite. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/spacex-launches-falcon9-rocket-iridium-next-satellites-live-stream-today-2019-01-11/ SpaceX has many existing launch licenses. See Faa.gov below. https://www.faa.gov/data_research/commercial_space_data/licenses/


3

Violation of trade restrictions In addition to @PearsonArtPhoto ‘s answer of the FAA and FCC regulations, launching from another facility would violate the International Traffic in Arms Regulations and Export Administration Regulations ( ITAR and EAR). From the ITAR wiki page: For practical purposes, ITAR regulations dictate that information and ...


2

A launch pad with a launch tower suitable for that specific rocket would be neccessary. Also a launch control center with all those computers and terminals. Antennas and receivers for the telemetry of the rocket. A lot of connections fitting to the rocket for tanking of fluids and gases. Many electrical connections for ground power and sensors needed for ...


1

Symposium will not be held. Source: I asked Jonathan.


1

The Outer Space Treaty represents the basic legal framework of international space law and, among its principles, it bars States Parties to the Treaty from placing nuclear weapons or any other weapons of mass destruction in orbit of Earth, installing them on the Moon or any other celestial body, or to otherwise station them in outer space. It ...


1

It's currently a state-owned corporation According to this news article (which is linked as source in the German Wikipedia) Roscosmos was a Goverment agency until Jan 1st 2016 when a decree to abolish the Federal Space Agency and turn it into a state-run space corporation came into force that president Putin signed in July 2015. The Roscosmos homepage ...


1

If we're strictly talking licensing (and assuming you're in the US), you need a lot of FAA licensing The FAA issues a commercial space transportation license or experimental permit when we determine that your launch or reentry proposal, your proposal to operate a launch or reentry site, or your proposal to test equipment, design or operating techniques ...


1

I wonder if it is true that "In Space, No One Can Hear You Claim." You can claim it, then you can announce your claim, but what happens next in terms of recognition, and enforcement is another matter. What will you do about space-bourne claim-jumpers and space pirates? Can you put a nuclear reactor on it, sure! You can copy the designs of the kilopower ...


1

@SpaceLawyer's answer is accepted but recent news about a nearly one million dollar fine paid to the FCC helps clarify the fact that they flew without permission from the US government further clarifies that the US government hadn't authorized the bees. Since ISRO didn't take responsibility for the bees either, these are unauthorized bees! TechCrunch's FCC ...


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