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3

There are no such regulations, so I can't think of any reason why SpaceX couldn't refuse to launch a competitor's satellites. The relevant regulator here is the FAA, and specifically AST. AST regulates the launch and reentry of space objects from the United States. AST's authority to regulate these activities is set out in U.S. law. That authority is focused ...


3

Wildly unrealistic for many reasons, but I'll just focus on the legal ones. First, as you say, the Moon Treaty is not widely ratified. Those countries that HAVE ratified the Agreement are of course subject to its provisions. But lets set that aside since here we are assuming that the countries in question aren't parties to the Moon Treaty. It is possible for ...


5

No. Although as stated in another answer, the International side of the ISS is under the jurisdiction and control of the relevant partners, that doesn't mean that those modules are the TERRITORY of the relevant states. It is a lot like embassies, which, despite the Simpsons episode to the contrary, are absolutely not territory of their home state, despite ...


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