Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.

New answers tagged

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Concern was not that the lunar dust will rise and cover the solar panels or instruments. The concern was as pointed out in the comments is that the dust particles rising up and hitting the lower bay of the lander and damaging or punching a hole. The simulation was done to study plume interaction with soil, the four plume cones when they interact with ground ...


1

How can the relative (physical) costs per Lunar landing of 1) going directly, 2) docking in LEO and 3) building and docking with the Lunar halo Gateway, be estimated and compared? Let's assume that all cases include at least a brief stay in LEO, as was done with the Apollo missions (about 2 and a half hours). In case 2, we add the cost of rendezvous and ...


3

Without considering money or engineering complexity as the measure, this is hard to measure. In theory earth orbit rendezvous is not much more costly in terms of delta-v. This is because there is a slight unavoidable cost of the ability to do the transfer burn while still inside the atmosphere. However the Apollo launches got into orbit before transferring ...


0

I don't think any of the other answers have pointed out that you come down with the same speed that you went up with. On earth, I can't jump so high that I can't safely land, and so on the moon I wouldn't be able to either. The difference with the moon is that I would be in the air a lot longer. If I overrotated and landed on my head I could die, just as I ...


2

Although this question has many answers already, I thought I'd add a more general answer How far could a human fall in a pressurised environment on various solar system bodies? I'm imagining that there are multi-story habitats on various bodies in the solar system, all pressurised to 1 atm. I'm also imagining that these habitats have a 'lift shaft' of ...


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"Yes", and in fact there are spacecraft that do this all the time in Earth orbit - the geostationary communications satellites. There is only one such orbit, realistically, and therefore, at least to a first order approximation, these spacecraft are in the same space relative to the sun as others. Really you're just asking if it's possible to send two or ...


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